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We have a MySQL table that looks something like this (insignificant columns removed):

CREATE TABLE `my_data` (
  `auto_id` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `created_ts` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,
  `updated_ts` timestamp NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
  `data_txt` varchar(256) CHARACTER SET utf8 NOT NULL,
  `issued_ts` timestamp NULL DEFAULT NULL,
  `account_id` int(11) NOT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`auto_id`),
  KEY `account_issued_idx` (`account_id`,`issued_ts`),
  KEY `account_issued_created_idx` (`account_id`,`issued_ts`,`created_ts`),
  KEY `account_created_idx` (`account_id`,`created_ts`),
  KEY `issued_idx` (`issued_ts`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB;

We have approximately 900M rows in the table, with one account_id accounting for more than 65% of those rows. I'm being asked to write queries across date ranges for both created_ts and issued_ts that depend upon the account_id, which appears to have a 1:1 functional dependence on the auto increment key.

A typical query would look like this:

SELECT * 
FROM my_data 
WHERE account_id = 1 AND 
      created_ts > TIMESTAMP('2012-01-01') AND 
      created_ts <= TIMESTAMP('2012-01-21') 
ORDER BY created_ts DESC LIMIT 100;

An EXPLAIN on the query shows this:

*************************** 1. row ***************************
           id: 1
  select_type: SIMPLE
        table: my_data
         type: range
possible_keys: account_issued_idx, account_issued_created_idx, account_created_idx,
      key: account_issued_created_idx
  key_len: 8
      ref: NULL
     rows: 365314721
    Extra: Using where

The problem is that the query takes far too long and is eventually killed. I've let it run a couple of times and it brings the down the database host because the OS (Linux) runs out of swap space.

I've researched the issue, repeatedly, and have tried to break up the query into uncorrelated subqueries, forcing indexes, using an explicit SELECT clause, and limiting the window of the date range, but the result is the same: poor performance (too slow) and too taxing on the host (invariably dies).

My question(s) are:

  1. Is it possible that a query can be formulated to slice the data into date ranges and perform acceptably for a real-time call? ( < 1s)

  2. Are there optimizations that I'm missing, or may help, in order to get the performance I am being asked to get?

Any other suggestions, hints, or thoughts are welcomed.

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
Check the performance after removing Order by clause. –  Romil May 24 '12 at 16:32

4 Answers 4

Seems mysql uses wrong index for this query, try to force another:

SELECT * 
FROM my_data FORCE INDEX (`account_created_idx`)
WHERE account_id = 1 AND 
      created_ts > TIMESTAMP('2012-01-01') AND 
      created_ts <= TIMESTAMP('2012-01-21') 
ORDER BY created_ts DESC LIMIT 100;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks a LOT. Did not know about FORCE INDEX... +10 if I could. –  mshsayem Oct 9 '13 at 4:29

Try MariaDB (or MySQL 5.6), as their Optimizer can do it faster. I am using it for some months, and for some queries like yours it's 1000% faster.

You need Index Condition Pushdown: http://kb.askmonty.org/en/index-condition-pushdown/

share|improve this answer
    
MySQL 5.6 is not out as a stable release. Not yet. –  ypercube May 24 '12 at 17:27
    
I know. It just to add more information. I am using MariaDB, as this product is in production stage. –  Moshe L May 24 '12 at 17:30

Do not use function in the comparision. Calculate the timestamps and use the computed values, otherwise you can't use the index to compare created_ts, and it's the field that will filter million of rows from the resultset

share|improve this answer

Not sure why MySQL uses the (obviously) not best index. Besides forcing the index, can you try the EXPLAIN plan on this variation:

SELECT * 
FROM my_data 
WHERE account_id = 1 AND 
      created_ts > TIMESTAMP('2012-01-01') AND 
      created_ts <= TIMESTAMP('2012-01-21') 
ORDER BY account_id
       , created_ts DESC 
LIMIT 100;
share|improve this answer

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