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As stated above, is it redundant to inherit from Object in c#? Do both sets of code below result in equivalent objects being defined?

class TestClassUno : Object
{
    // Stuff
}

vs.

class TestClassDos
{
    // Stuff
}

I snooped around on MSDN but wasn't able to find anything perfectly conclusive.

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12  
Any class definition that doesn't explicitly specify a base class will inherit from object implicitly. –  Jeff Mercado May 24 '12 at 16:58

6 Answers 6

up vote 30 down vote accepted

If left unspecified every class definition will implicitly inherit from System.Object hence the two definitions are equivalent.

The only time these two would be different is if someone actually defined another Object type in the same namespace. In this case the local definition of Object would take precedence and change the inheritance object

namespace Example {
  class Object { } 
  class C : Object { } 
}

Very much a corner case but wouldn't point it out if I hadn't seen it before

Note that the same is not true if you used object instead of Object. The C# keyword object is a type alias for System.Object and hence it wouldn't match Example.Object.

namespace Example2 { 
  class Object { } 
  class C : Object { } // Uses Example.Object
  class D : object { } // Uses System.Object
}

Of course if you have a truly evil developer you could still cause confusion with object

namespace System { 
  class Object { 
    private Object() { } 
  }
}

namespace Example3 {
  // This will properly fail to compile since it can't bind to the private
  // Object constructor.  This demonstrates that we are using our definition
  // of Object instead of mscorlib's 
  class C : object { } // Uses our System.Object
}
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7  
Wouldn't the local Example.Object still inherit from System.Object ? –  Aren May 24 '12 at 17:04
1  
@Aren the local Object indeed would but C in this case would inherit from Example.Object –  JaredPar May 24 '12 at 17:05
    
Thanks for the quick response. That's certainly not a case I would have thought about - good call. –  Keplah May 24 '12 at 17:28
    
@Aren: Yes, but Jared's point is that in this case, writing C : Object is not redundant. –  BlueRaja - Danny Pflughoeft May 24 '12 at 17:33
    
@Aren I would think that, ultimately, it would... but the middle/local "Object" could be overwritten, modified, extended... Unless I understand this wrong. –  WernerCD May 24 '12 at 19:26

Yes, everything ultimately inherits from an object if defined as class. Leave the explicit inheritance out of your code.

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struct too, actually. –  dolan May 24 '12 at 17:15
    
@Cicada, You are right. –  Aren May 24 '12 at 17:17
1  
@Cicada: struct derives directly from System.ValueType. It does also derive from System.Object (everything does eventually), but struct types don't even apply to the OP because they can only implement interfaces; a construct declared as a struct can never derive directly from anything but ValueType. –  KeithS May 24 '12 at 21:00
    
@KeithS I know. I just thought this answer was slightly misleading. –  dolan May 24 '12 at 21:13

Yes it is redundant to inherit from object in class

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MSDN : Object class : Supports all classes in the .NET Framework class hierarchy and provides low-level services to derived classes. This is the ultimate base class of all classes in the .NET Framework; it is the root of the type hierarchy.

Check this research : inherits from object? An investigation into how.

enter image description here

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Object is the mother of all classes in .Net. There is nothing above it.

All classes inherit from it. So this code

class TestClassDos
{
    // Stuff
}

automatically means it is inheriting from object.

Proof: You can typecast any entity to object which is possible if it is inheriting from it.

Summary of Object class says

// Supports all classes in the .NET Framework class hierarchy and provides low-level
// services to derived classes. This is the ultimate base class of all classes
// in the .NET Framework; it is the root of the type hierarchy.
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You will also find .ToString() in interfaces in .NET, yet interfaces don't inherit from System.Object. (I agree with your conclusion, just not with the proof you give.) –  hvd May 24 '12 at 17:07
    
@hvd: But ultimately interfaces will be implemented by classes. –  Nikhil Agrawal May 24 '12 at 17:08
1  
Yes, or by structs, which also inherit from object. But my point is that the fact that .ToString() is available is only because of a special exception in the compiler that adds object's members even for some types that don't actually inherit from object. –  hvd May 24 '12 at 17:11
    
@hvd: Got your point. –  Nikhil Agrawal May 24 '12 at 17:12

Yes, they are both the same thing, I don't think I saw anyone mention structs, but all objects (that is regardless if you declare a class or a struct) they all ultimately inherit from Object, see this Object MSDN article and this other article on Structs

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