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I want to implement an 'active' flag for rules in my DSL. Here's how I wanted it to look like:

Shipping("Standard") {
    active: true
    description: "some text"

    rules {
      ... define rules here
    }
}

Here's how I got everything running following several tutorials:

Script dslScript = new GroovyShell().parse(new File("Standard"))

dslScript.metaClass.Shipping = { String name, Closure cl ->
  ShippingDelegate delegate = new ShippingDelegate()
  delegate.name = name
  cl.delegate = delegate
  cl.setResolveStrategy Closure.DELEGATE_FIRST
  cl()
}

dslScript.run()

ShippingDelegate is simple:

class ShippingDelegate {

  String name

  void rules(Closure cl) {
    ... do stuff here
  }
}

It all runs fine without complaints but how can I access 'active' or 'description'?

What does this syntax actually do anyway? It looks like a map assignment, but there is none. Or does the groovy compiler treat it as an incomplete ternary operator?

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2 Answers 2

May I suggest a small change in your DSL so that your design can be simplified?

Edited, it is not clear in you example if you have more than one shipping instance. In my second try, I assume that the answer is yes

class ShippingRules {
    boolean active
    String description
    String name


    ShippingRules(String name) {
        this.name=name
    }

    def rules(Closure c) {
        c.delegate=this
        c()
    }
}



abstract class ShippingRulesScript extends Script {
    def shipppingRules =[]

    def shipping(String name, Closure c) {
        def newRules=new ShippingRules(name)
        shipppingRules << newRules
        c.delegate=newRules
        c()
    }
}

def cfg= new CompilerConfiguration(
    scriptBaseClass:ShippingRulesScript.name
)
Script dslScript = new GroovyShell(cfg).parse(new File("Standard"))

dslScript.run()

The DSL should be changed to this:

shipping("Standard") {
    active= true
    description= "some text"

    rules {
      ... define rules here
    }
}
shipping("International") {
    active= true
    description= "some text"

    rules {
      ... define rules here
    }
}

I.e. lose the capital to shipping, and use assignments instead of colons.

You would then later be able to retrieve the shipping rules from your dslScript shippingRules variable.

disclaimer: I cannot test my code right now, so there may be some typos in the code, but you get the general idea: use a base class where you provide your rules and properties to your script.

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Thanks for this! I was aware only of using ExpandoMetaClass to attach global functions to the Script's environment but this abstract class extension is much more easier and understandable. –  NagyI Dec 15 '13 at 14:30

I asked a similar question on Google+, see here.
The summary is: you can use the map syntax only on constructors (ctors) and as function parameters.

Interesting is that it doesn't throw an exception.

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