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I'm trying to make a very large, very legacy project testable.

We have a number of statically available services that most of our code uses. The problem is that these are hard to mock. They used to be singletons. Now they are pseudo-singletons -- same static interface but the functions delegate to an instance object that can be switched out. Like this:

class ServiceEveryoneNeeds
{
    public static IImplementation _implementation = new RealImplementation();

    public IEnumerable<FooBar> GetAllTheThings() { return _implementation.GetAllTheThings(); }
}

Now in my unit test:

void MyTest()
{
    ServiceEveryoneNeeds._implementation = new MockImplementation();
}

So far, so good. In prod, we only need the one implementation. But tests run in parallel and might need different mocks, so I did this:

class Dependencies
{
     //set this in prod to the real impl
     public static IImplementation _realImplementation;

     //unit tests set these
     [ThreadStatic]
     public static IImplementation _mock;

     public static IImplementation TheImplementation
     { get {return _realImplementation ?? _mock; } }

     public static void Cleanup() { _mock = null; }
}

And then:

class ServiceEveryoneNeeds
{
     static IImplementation GetImpl() { return Dependencies.TheImplementation; }

     public static IEnumerable<FooBar> GetAllTheThings() {return GetImpl().GetAllTheThings(); }

}

//and
void MyTest()
{
    Dependencies._mock = new BestMockEver();
    //test
    Dependencies.Cleanup();
}

We took this route because it's a massive project to constructor inject these services into every class that needs them. At the same time, these are universal services within our codebase that most functions depend on.

I understand that this pattern is bad in the sense that it hides dependencies, as opposed to constructor injection which makes dependencies explicit.

However the benefits are:
- we can start unit testing immediately, vs doing a 3 month refactor and then unit testing.
- we still have globals, but this appears to be strictly better than where we were.

While our dependencies are still implicit, I would argue that this approach is strictly better than what we had. Aside from the hidden dependencies, is this worse in some way than using a proper DI container? What problems will I run into?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Its a service locator which is bad. But you already know that. If your code base is that massive, why not start a partial migration? Register the singleton instances with the container and start constructor injecting them whenever you touch a class in your code. Then you can leave most parts in a (hopefully) working condition and get the benefits of DI everywhere else.

Ideally the parts without DI should shrink over time. And you can start testing right away.

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3  
No, this is not a Service Locator. This is an ambient context. The slight but important differences are that the type is well defined where as a ServiceLocator is designed to provide any type. And there is a local default so the code will run without any configuration with the default behavior, but it still allows to replace the local default to get a different behavior. This is not bad if used in the right situations. Although there situations are very rare. –  Remo Gloor May 25 '12 at 7:27
1  
Yes, technically you are absolutely right. But personally I would not refer to a full blown service as an ambient context. Mark Seemann's sample of a TimeProvider has a small and well defined scope. ServiceEveryOneNeeds ... does not quite sound so. –  Sebastian Weber May 25 '12 at 9:55

This is called an ambient context. There is nothing wrong in using an ambient context if used and implemented correctly. There are some preconditions when an ambient context may be used:

  1. It must be a cross cutting concern that returns some value
  2. You need a local default
  3. You have to make sure that null can not be assigned. (Use a Null implementation instead)

For cross cutting concerns that do not return values e.g. Logging you should prefer interception. For other dependencies that are not cross cutting concerns you should do constructor injection.

Your implementation has several problems though (does not prevent assigning null, naming, no default). Here is how you could implement it:

public class SomeCrossCuttingConcern
{
     private static ISomeCrossCuttingConcern default = new DefaultSomeCrossCuttingConcern();

     [ThreadStatic]
     private static ISomeCrossCuttingConcern current;

     public static ISomeCrossCuttingConcern Default
     { 
         get { return default; }
         set 
         { 
             if (value == null) 
                 throw new ArgumentNullException(); 
             default = value; 
         } 
     }

     public static ISomeCrossCuttingConcern Current
     { 
         get 
         { 
             if (current == null)
                 current = default; 
             return current; 
         }

         set 
         { 
             if (value == null) 
                 throw new ArgumentNullException(); 
             current = value; 
         } 
     }

     public static void ResetToDefault() { current = null; }
}

An ambient context has that advantage that you don't pollute your API for cross cutting concerns.

But on the other hand regarding testing you tests can become dependent. E.g. if you forget to setup your mock for one test it runs correctly if the mock was setup by another test before. But when it is run standalone or in a different order it will fail. It makes testing more difficult.

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I think what you're doing is not bad. You are trying to make your code base testable, and the trick is to do that in little steps. You'll get this same advice when reading Working Effectively With Legacy Code. Downside of what you're doing however, is that once you start using depedency injection, you will have to refactor your code base again. But more importantly, you will have to change a lot of test code.

I agree with Alex. Prefer using constructor injection instead of using an ambient context. You don't have to directly refactor your whole code base for this, but constructor injection will 'bubble' up the call stack, and you will have to make a 'cut' somewere to prevent it bubbling up, because this forces you to make a lot of changes throughout the code base.

I'm working currently on a legacy code base and can't use a DI container (the pain). Still I use constructor injection where I can, which sometimes means I have to revert to using poor mans dependency injection on some types. This is the trick I use to stop the 'constructor injection bubble'. Still, this is much better than using an ambient context. Poor man's DI is sub optimal, but still allows you to write proper unit tests and makes it much easier later on to break out that default constructor later on.

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Dependency injection and using a DI container are really separate undertakings, although one leads naturally to the other. Using a DI container implies that the code has a certain structure. Such a structure is probably easier to read, and is certainly easier to work on without deep knowledge of the hidden dependencies, and is therefore more maintainable.

Now that you no longer depend on concretions, you have implemented a form of inversion of control. I think that is a better design, and represents a good starting point for making the code more testable. It sounds like you got some immediate value from this step.

Would you be better to have explicit dependencies than implicit dependencies (in other words DI vs ambient context)? I would be inclined to say yes, but it really depends on the cost versus the benefit. The benefit depends on things like the cost of introducing bugs, how much churn you are likely to see in the code, how hard it is to debug, who will be maintaining it, what its expected life span is, etc.

Global mutable static state is always bad. Some clever soul might decide that they need to swap out the implementation of a global service while they make a call, then replace it afterwards. This might go badly wrong if they don't clean up afterwards. That might be a stupid example, but such unintended side effects are always bad, so it is better to eliminate them entirely by design. You can prevent them with discipline and vigilance, but it is harder.

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