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If we compile the following code and run the resulting application, we will interact with it by entering our name, pressing enter, and pressing any key to exit. All of these actions are done on a console window.

using System;

namespace HelloWorld
{
    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.Write("Enter your name: ");
            var name = Console.ReadLine();
            Console.WriteLine("Your name is {0} ", name);
            Console.ReadKey();

        }
    }
}

Is it possible to save all of these actions to a text file such that I can make use of it as a log?

Edit:

I should explain the real scenario. I am writing a book about C#. I want to avoid attaching the screen shot of the console window to the book because I want to make the file size of my book as small as possible. Instead, I want to attach a text file showing the content of console window to the book. Adding additional code (for creating the text file) will complicate the code example, which in turn will make the reader get confused.

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Like, by magic? or open a file, write the action, close? –  Tiago Peczenyj May 24 '12 at 18:03
3  
@TiagoPeczenyj I vote for the magic approach! –  Reed Copsey May 24 '12 at 18:03
    
@ReedCopsey Magic approach it is. It'll take me about 15 min. to write one up. –  Servy May 24 '12 at 18:05
    
some years ago I find a rubygem who use "aspects" to log each method with each params and generate a big log file. and it is not help. –  Tiago Peczenyj May 24 '12 at 18:06
    
I think "tee" from some unix utilities port (Cygwin?) would do... or maybe Powershell's tee (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tee_%28command%29) –  Alexei Levenkov May 24 '12 at 18:30

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Okay, so the idea here is to change the reader/writer for console input and output to do what they did before but also write out to a log file. I made a Log class which should probably be extended so as to take the filename/path as a parameter, but it was important to have one so that the output stream could be synchronized.

public class Log
{
    private StreamWriter output;
    public Log()
    {
        output = new StreamWriter(File.OpenWrite("output.txt"));

    }
    public void Write(char c)
    {
        lock (output)
        {
            output.Write(c);
        }
    }
    public void Close()
    {
        output.Close();
    }
}

public class MyConsoleOutput : TextWriter
{
    private TextWriter standard;
    private Log log;

    public MyConsoleOutput(TextWriter standard, Log log)
    {
        this.standard = standard;
        this.log = log;
    }

    public override void Write(char value)
    {
        standard.Write(value);
        log.Write(value);
    }

    public override Encoding Encoding
    {
        get { return Encoding.Default; }
    }

    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        standard.Dispose();
    }
}

public class MyConsoleInput : TextReader
{
    private TextReader standard;
    private Log log;
    public MyConsoleInput(TextReader standard, Log log)
    {
        this.standard = standard;
        this.log = log;
    }

    public override int Peek()
    {
        return standard.Peek();
    }


    public override int Read()
    {
        int result = standard.Read();
        log.Write((char)result);
        return result;
    }
    protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        standard.Dispose();
    }
}

Now that we've created these classes we'll do the following right at the start of Main:

Log log = new Log();
Console.SetOut(new MyConsoleOutput(Console.Out, log));
Console.SetIn(new MyConsoleInput(Console.In, log));

We'll also need this at the end of Main:

log.Close();

It's a somewhat quick and dirty write up. If you use this in production you'll likely want to change a lot of the class/method names.

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This is the best answer –  gabba May 24 '12 at 18:39
    
is it possible to hide the pre and post codes in Main to avoid cluttering the original code? –  kiss my armpit May 24 '12 at 18:43
    
+1 from me for this one - I don't know that I'd ever want to use this, as I'd probably prefer to have my logging write out differently than my console output, but it does handle the OP's issues pretty cleanly. –  Reed Copsey May 24 '12 at 18:57
    
@Forgiver Well, for everything at the start you could wrap it all in a method, and you could use a using to close the writer at the end instead of explicitly calling Close (not sure if that would be cleaner or not). Other than that I'm not sure what you could do. –  Servy May 24 '12 at 19:02

There is nothing that will automatically "shadow" your console IO, so you'll have to do this yourself. That being said, it's fairly easy to open a text file and write anything you want to it.

In your case, just open a text file, and write the information to it as you write to the console and read from the console, as needed. For details, see MSDN's How to: Write To a Text File.

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"There is nothing that will automatically 'shadow' your console IO" Well, you could change the standard input/output streams to also write to files in addition to doing what they're already doing. –  Servy May 24 '12 at 18:04
    
@Servy Yeah - again, not automatic and built in - but yes, you could make your own stream class that did both. The input will be odd, though, as you'd be coupling the input to the output... –  Reed Copsey May 24 '12 at 18:08
    
You were right. It was a bit odd to have input and output together. I ended up needing to make a Log class to have it work out well. If they were written separately it could go away I imagine. Link –  Servy May 24 '12 at 18:31

You could use a StreamWriter to output what you capture via the Console:

using (System.IO.StreamWriter file = new System.IO.StreamWriter(@"C:\ProgramOutput.txt", true))
        {
            file.WriteLine(name);
        }  
share|improve this answer

This example helps you:

Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
FileStream fs = new FileStream("Test.txt", FileMode.Create);
// First, save the standard output.
TextWriter tmp = Console.Out;
StreamWriter sw = new StreamWriter(fs);
Console.SetOut(sw);
Console.WriteLine("Hello file");
Console.SetOut(tmp);
Console.WriteLine("Hello World");
sw.Close();

Read more at: http://msdn.microsoft.com/ru-ru/library/system.console.setin.aspx, http://msdn.microsoft.com/ru-ru/library/system.console.setout.aspx, http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.console.in.aspx, http://msdn.microsoft.com/ru-ru/library/system.console.out.aspx

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