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class Airplane
  attr_reader :weight, :aircraft_type
  attr_accessor :speed, :altitude, :course

  def initialize(aircraft_type, options = {})
    @aircraft_type  = aircraft_type.to_s 
    @course = options[:course.to_s + "%"] || rand(1...360).to_s + "%" 
  end 

How I can use minimum and maximum allowable values ​​for the hash in initialize from 1 to 360?

Example:

airplane1 = Airplane.new("Boeing 74", course: 200)
p radar1.airplanes
=> [#<Airplane:0x000000023dfc78 @aircraft_type="Boeing 74", @course="200%"]

But if I set to course value 370, airplane1 should not work

share|improve this question
1  
Your question isn't very clear. What are the "allowable" values? What hash are you referring to? What do you expect the end value of said hash to be given certain inputs? – Andrew Marshall May 24 '12 at 18:14
1  
Okay, so you want to ensure that options[:course] is within a specified range of values? If it isn't though, what happens? ("Doesn't work" isn't very clear.) – Andrew Marshall May 24 '12 at 18:23
    
yep, I want :course with a specified range of values, if it isn't - would be great to automatically insert the maximum value – Savroff May 24 '12 at 18:28
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This could be refactored i'm sure but this is what i came up with

class Plane

  attr_reader :weight, :aircraft_type
  attr_accessor :speed, :altitude, :course

  def initialize(aircraft_type, options = {})
    @aircraft_type = aircraft_type.to_s 
    @course = options[:course] || random_course
    check_course  
  end

  def check_course
   if @course < 1 or @course > 360
      @course = 1
      puts "Invalid course. Set min"
     elsif @course > 360
      @course = 360
      puts "Invalid course. Set max"
     else
      @course = @course
     end
   end

   def random_course
    @course = rand(1..360)
   end

end
share|improve this answer
    
works for me? not sure – Tallboy May 24 '12 at 18:41
1  
rand understanding a Range argument is a 1.9.3 thing that isn't in 1.9.2. PS: you're going to be doubling your % signs if you end up using a random course, no? – mu is too short May 24 '12 at 18:52

course is an angle, isn't it? shouldn't it be 0...360 the valid range for it? and why the final "%"? and why work with a string instead of an integer?

Anyway, that's what I'd write:

@course = ((options[:course] || rand(360)) % 360).to_s + "%"
share|improve this answer

I think you mean you don't want to let people pass in something like {course: '9000%'} for options and you want to error out if it's invalid. If that's the case, you can just test if it's in range:

def initialize(aircraft_type, options = {})
  @aircraft_type  = aircraft_type.to_s 
  allowed_range = 1...360
  passed_course = options[:course]
  @course = case passed_course
    when nil
      "#{rand allowed_range}%"
    when allowed_range
      "#{passed_course}%"
    else 
      raise ArgumentError, "Invalid course: #{passed_course}"
  end
end 
share|improve this answer
    
Which version of rand knows what to do with a Range? And raising an ArgumentError might be a better idea than a RuntimeError. – mu is too short May 24 '12 at 18:32
    
@muistooshort: 1.9.3 rand supports ranges. I'm pretty sure it's new in that version. Since the OP used it, I assumed it was a safe assumption to make that his Ruby was up-to-date. And you're right about the error type. Thanks for that. – Chuck May 24 '12 at 18:46
1  
Yeah, it is a 1.9.3 thing and I was using 1.9.2. That'll each me not to RTFM. – mu is too short May 24 '12 at 18:51

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