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I am aggregating multiple values for keys in a multi-threaded environment. The keys are not known in advance. I thought I would do something like this:

class Aggregator {
    protected ConcurrentHashMap<String, List<String>> entries = new ConcurrentHashMap<String, List<String>>();

    public Aggregator() {}

    public void record(String key, String value) {
        List<String> newList = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>());
        List<String> existingList = entries.putIfAbsent(key, newList);
        List<String> values = existingList == null ? newList : existingList;
        values.add(value);
    }
}

The problem I see is that every time through this method I need to create a new instance of an ArrayList, which I then throw away in most cases. This seems like unjustified abuse of the garbage collector. Is there a better, thread-safe way of initializing this kind of a structure without having to synchronize the record method? I am somewhat surprised by the decision to have the putIfAbsent method not return the newly-created element, and by lack of a way to defer instantiation unless it is called for (so to speak).

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6  
Don't worry about extra objects unless there is a benchmark. Short-lived object allocation/GC is cheap cheap cheap in modern JVMs. (I guess "some" is more than "none", but the modern JVM has no problem with this in general.) In any case, still an interesting question insofar as it will hopefully yield some interesting approaches. "Deferring" allocation and such is a bit awkward in Java, and thus not common, due to lack of closures or "pass by name" semantics. (Anonymous classes aren't that sexy and would generally need to have a corresponding interface as well as an overload for putIf..). –  user166390 May 24 '12 at 19:03
    
More than two years later and still a great question. I really wish Java 1.8 had added something like putIfAbsent (K key, Supplier<V> value) for lazy instantiation of the default object. It certainly has retrofitted other support for the streams API onto the ConcurrentMap interface. –  sparc_spread Sep 23 '14 at 16:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Try this:

public void record(String key, String value) {
    List<String> values = entries.get(key);
    if (values == null) {
        entries.putIfAbsent(key, Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>()));
        // At this point, there will definitely be a list for the key.
        // We don't know or care which thread's new object is in there, so:
        values = entries.get(key);
    }
    values.add(value);
}

This is the standard code pattern when populating a ConcurrentHashMap.

The special method putIfAbsent(K, V)) will either put your value object in, or if another thread got before you, then it will ignore your value object. Either way, after the call to putIfAbsent(K, V)), get(key) is guaranteed to be consistent between threads and therefore the above code is threadsafe.

The only wasted overhead is if some other thread adds a new entry at the same time for the same key: You may end up throwing away the newly created value, but that only happens if there is not already an entry and there's a race that your thread loses, which would typically be rare.

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1  
I miss having a Java equivalent of Python's defaultdict... does anyone else? –  Platinum Azure May 24 '12 at 19:25
    
3  
So the putIfAbsent call replaces the values variable with a null; this code needs a test to see if putIfAbsent returned null. –  Gene Golovchinsky May 24 '12 at 19:56
    
@GeneGolovchinsky You're right! I've fixed the code. Thanks for noticing that (I really should have checked...) –  Bohemian May 25 '12 at 0:05
    
What if a second thread removes the entry before the get? –  Erlend Apr 23 '14 at 18:31

In the end, I implemented a slight modification of @Bohemian's answer. His proposed solution overwrites the values variable with the putIfAbsent call, which creates the same problem I had before. The code that seems to work looks like this:

    public void record(String key, String value) {
        List<String> values = entries.get(key);
        if (values == null) {
            values = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>());
            List<String> values2 = entries.putIfAbsent(key, values);
            if (values2 != null)
                values = values2;
        }
        values.add(value);
    }

It's not as elegant as I'd like, but it's better than the original that creates a new ArrayList instance at every call.

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2  
As of Java-8 you can replace this with: entries.computeIfAbsent(key, k -> Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>())).add(value) –  Peter May 26 '14 at 0:28
1  
@Peter Please post your comment as an answer because with lambadas is the most elegant and clear way. –  m3th0dman Aug 27 '14 at 19:06
    
The original answer only creates an ArrayList instance if the key is not already there so that doesn't seem too bad to me. –  Graeme Moss Oct 14 '14 at 11:13

Created two versions based on Gene's answer

public  static <K,V> void putIfAbsetMultiValue(ConcurrentHashMap<K,List<V>> entries, K key, V value) {
    List<V> values = entries.get(key);
    if (values == null) {
        values = Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<V>());
        List<V> values2 = entries.putIfAbsent(key, values);
        if (values2 != null)
            values = values2;
    }
    values.add(value);
}

public  static <K,V> void putIfAbsetMultiValueSet(ConcurrentMap<K,Set<V>> entries, K key, V value) {
    Set<V> values = entries.get(key);
    if (values == null) {
        values = Collections.synchronizedSet(new HashSet<V>());
        Set<V> values2 = entries.putIfAbsent(key, values);
        if (values2 != null)
            values = values2;
    }
    values.add(value);
}

It works well

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As of Java-8 you can create Multi Maps using the following pattern:

public void record(String key, String value) { entries.computeIfAbsent(key, k -> Collections.synchronizedList(new ArrayList<String>())) .add(value); }

The ConcurrentHashMap documentation (not the general contract) specifies that the ArrayList will only be created once for each key, at the slight initial cost of delaying updates while the ArrayList is being created for a new key:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/8/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/ConcurrentHashMap.html#computeIfAbsent-K-java.util.function.Function-

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Waste of memory (also GC etc.) that Empty Array list creation problem is handled with Java 1.7.40. Don't worry about creating empty arraylist. Reference : http://javarevisited.blogspot.com.tr/2014/07/java-optimization-empty-arraylist-and-Hashmap-cost-less-memory-jdk-17040-update.html

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