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I have code as

  <select name="d" ><option value="sdf" class="test1">How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text  text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text </option></select>

I need to wrap text inside the listbox. How we can do it ?? I tried in CSS Wrap text .. its not working.

Please help me guys

Regards Dipen

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2  
You cannot wrap text inside options, but you can write custom ellipsis for (text > some length) so that the width of the drop down is in control. –  Vega May 24 '12 at 19:00
    
You can try this jquerry plugin to do exactly what you need github.com/fnagel/jquery-ui/wiki/Selectmenu –  TheNoble-Coder Jan 24 '13 at 16:04

4 Answers 4

You cannot do it with word-wrap - you might want to see this Word wrap options in a select list

Also, you could simulate the entire drop-down using an unordered list.

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You could try something like this:

<select name="d" class="myselect">
  <option value="sdf" class="test1">How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text  text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text
  </option>
</select>

You can do this with CSS:

.myselect {
    width: 150px;
    overflow: hidden;
    text-overflow: ellipsis;
}
.myselect option {
    white-space: nowrap;
    width: 100%
}

DEMO

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Try in this way,

style="word-wrap:break-word;width:100%;"

 <select name="d" style="word-wrap:break-word;width:100%;"><option value="sdf" class="test1">How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text  text How to wrap the big line text How to wrap the big line text </option></select>​
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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML 1.0 Transitional//EN" "http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-transitional.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
<meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=utf-8" />
<title> limited text</title>
<script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.10.2/jquery.min.js">
</script>

<script>

$(document).ready(function(){
    var l=$(".main div").text();
    var store=new Array();
    var i=0;
    $(".main div").each(function(){
    l=$(this).text().length;
    store[i]=$(this).text();
    i++;
    if(l>200){

        var a=$(this).text().slice(0,190);  
        $(this).text(a);
        var d=$(this).addClass("after");                
        }           
        });

    $(".main div").click(function(){        
            var id=$(this).attr("id");
            $(this).text(store[id-1]);
            var d=$(this).removeClass("after");
        });
    });

</script>

<style>
.main div { width:500px;word-wrap:break-word; background-color:#9CF; margin:5px; border:2px solid black}
.after:after{content:"...";}

</style>

</head>

<body>

<div class="main">
<div id="1">The oldest classical Greek and Latin writing had little or no spaces between words or other ones, and could be written in boustrophedon (alternating directions). Over time, text direction (left to right) became standardized, and word dividers and terminal punctuation became common. The first way to divide sentences into groups was the original paragraphos, similar to an underscore at the beginning of the new group.[3] The Greek paragraphos evolved into the pilcrow (¶), which in English manuscripts in the Middle Ages can be seen inserted inline between sentences. The hedera leaf (e.g. ☙) has also been used in the same way.</div>
<div id="2">In ancient manuscripts, another means to divide sentences in into paragraphs was a line break (newline) followed by an initial at the beginning of the next paragraph. An initial is an oversize capital letter, sometimes outdented beyond the margin of text. This style can be seen, for example, in the original Old English manuscript of Beowulf. Outdenting is still used in English typography, though not commonly.[4] Modern English typography usually indicates a new paragraph by indenting the first line. This style can be seen in the (handwritten) United States Constitution from 1787. For additional ornamentation, a hedera leaf or other symbol can be added to the inter-paragraph whitespace, or put in the indentation space.</div>
<div id="3">A second common modern English style is to use no indenting, but add vertical whitespace to create "block paragraphs". On a typewriter, a double carriage return produces a blank line for this purpose; professional typesetters may put in an arbitrary vertical space by adjusting leading. This style is very common in electronic formats, such as on the World Wide Web and email.</div>
<div id="4">How such documented are actually stored depends on the file format. For example, HTML uses the <p> tag as a paragraph container. In plaintext files, there are two common formats. Pre-formatted text will have a newline at the end of every physical line, and two newlines at the end of a paragraph, creating a blank line. An alternative is to only put newlines at the end of each paragraph, and leave word wrapping up to the application that displays or processes the text (if it is even necessary).</div>enter code here
</div>
<p> click on any paragraph...</p>
</body>
</html>
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Welcome to SO and thanks for posting an answer. For clarity I would suggest that you edit your post to add a few lines of text explaining your code. –  pschueller Mar 4 at 6:09

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