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Solving one bug I came to some interesting discoveries.

The result of this procedure

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int i4 = 4;
        Console.WriteLine("int i4 = 4;");
        Console.WriteLine("i4 % 1 = {0}", i4 % 1);

        double d4 = 4.0;
        Console.WriteLine("double d4 = 4.0;");
        Console.WriteLine("d4 % 1 = {0}", d4 % 1);
        Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------------------------------------");
        int i64 = 64;
        double dCubeRootOf64 = Math.Pow(i64, 1.0 / 3.0);
        Console.WriteLine("int i64 = 64;");
        Console.WriteLine("double dCubeRootOf64 = Math.Pow(i64, 1.0 / 3.0) = {0}", dCubeRootOf64);
        Console.WriteLine("dCubeRootOf64 = {0}", dCubeRootOf64);
        Console.WriteLine("dCubeRootOf64 % 1 = {0} ??????????????  Why 1. ??????????", dCubeRootOf64 % 1);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

is

int i4 = 4;
i4 % 1 = 0
double d4 = 4.0;
d4 % 1 = 0
-----------------------------------------------------------
int i64 = 64;
double dCubeRootOf64 = Math.Pow(i64, 1.0 / 3.0) = 4
dCubeRootOf64 = 4
dCubeRootOf64 % 1 = 1 ??????????????  Why 1. ??????????

int 4 % 1 = 0 -- correct

double 4.0 % 1 = 0 -- correct

But bug is in:

Math.Pow(64, 1.0 / 3.0) % 1 = 1

Cube root from 64 is 4. Why is in that case 4 % 1 = 1?

share|improve this question
    
Check out Google: (64^(1/3)) mod 1 –  Dan Andrews May 24 '12 at 19:06
    
If you want to make sure that it's an integer that you're getting the modulo for, try to cast it. –  Dan Andrews May 24 '12 at 19:10
    
You are looking for this I think stackoverflow.com/questions/618535/… –  Nevyn May 24 '12 at 19:11
    
possible duplicate of Why is modulus operator not working for double in c#? –  Ian Mercer May 24 '12 at 19:11
2  
Math.Pow(x, 1.0 / 3.0) doesn't calculate the cube root, even if Pow was infinitely precise (which it isn't), because 1.0 / 3.0 is not one third - it's 0.33333333333333331. –  harold May 24 '12 at 19:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

Math.Pow(64, 1.0 / 3.0) returns 3.9999999999999996.
This gets rounded to 4 when displayed.

Taking it modulo 1 returns 0.99999999999999956, which is similarly rounded to 1 when displayed.

You can see the true values by adding .ToString("R")

share|improve this answer
    
Then wouldn't the remainder returned from the modulus operator be something like .99999999 or .0000001 depending on the exact value of Math.Pow(64... etc), instead of the value 1? –  Grant Winney May 24 '12 at 19:11
    
Thanks, Math.Pow(64, 1.0 / 3.0) returns 3.9999999999999996. - This explains everything –  SelvirK May 24 '12 at 19:32

dCubeRootOf64 % 1 = 1 returns 1 instead 0; cause Math.Pow(i64, 1.0 / 3.0) returns 3.9999999999999996 and 3.9999999999999996 % 1 returns 0.99999999999999956 which in turn getting rounded to 1.

Thus the result 1.

share|improve this answer
1  
There must be some goofiness with doubles going on here. It shouldn't return 1. 1 goes into 64 exactly 64 times, so the result should be 0. –  Grant Winney May 24 '12 at 19:13
    
@GrantWinney: Exactly. 4.0%1 returns 0. –  SLaks May 24 '12 at 19:15
    
I just tried same posted code and it given 1 as o/p in 3.5 framework. –  Rahul May 24 '12 at 19:15
1  
@Rahul: Exactly. It's supposed to return 0. –  SLaks May 24 '12 at 19:16
    
@SLaks, correct ... edited my post. –  Rahul May 24 '12 at 19:24

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