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I have a table DEPT, which holds 2 columns - ID, NAME.

A search form is presented with the IDs from the DEPT table and the user can chose any number of IDs and submit the form, to get the related NAMEs.

Clarification/Inputs:

  • I don't want to build a dynamic query - its not manageable.
  • I prefer a stored procedure using table-valued parameters

Any other solutions to proceed?

NOTE:
This example is simple with 1 table - in real life, I have to deal with more than 6 tables!

Thanks for any suggestions

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by a dynamic query not being manageable? It would be easier to say IN (1,2,4,5) then to build a table-valued parameter. –  mellamokb May 24 '12 at 19:48
    
Can you use XML parameters? (version of SQL not specified) –  StingyJack May 24 '12 at 19:51
2  
possible duplicate of Passing an array of parameters to Stored Procedure –  StingyJack May 24 '12 at 19:52
2  
What is the relevance of the EXISTS in your title? –  Dan Puzey May 24 '12 at 19:57
    
I don't like the proposed duplicate - the accepted answer uses an XML document method, and none of the answers use table-valued parameters. How about this one instead? He'd only have to change it from an INSERT/SELECT to a SELECT ... WHERE IN. –  Aaron Bertrand May 24 '12 at 20:14

1 Answer 1

CREATE TYPE dbo.DeptList
AS TABLE
(
  ID INT
);
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.RetrieveDepartments
  @dept_list AS dbo.DeptList READONLY
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  SELECT Name FROM dbo.table1 WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM @dept)
  UNION ALL 
  SELECT Name FROM dbo.table2 WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM @dept)
  -- ...
END
GO

Now in your C# code, create a DataTable, fill it in with the IDs, and pass it in to the stored procedure. Assuming you already have a list called tempList and the IDs are stored in id:

DataTable tvp = new DataTable();
tvp.Columns.Add(new DataColumn("ID"));

foreach(var item in tempList)
{ 
    tvp.Rows.Add(item.id); 
}

using (connObject)
{
    SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("StoredProcedure", connObject);
    cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
    SqlParameter tvparam = cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@dept_list", tvp);
    tvparam.SqlDbType = SqlDbType.Structured;
    ...
}

You can also use a split function. Many exist, this is the one I like if you can guarantee that the input is safe (no <, >, & etc.):

CREATE FUNCTION dbo.SplitInts_XML
(
   @List       VARCHAR(MAX),
   @Delimiter  CHAR(1)
)
RETURNS TABLE
AS
   RETURN 
   (  
      SELECT Item = y.i.value('(./text())[1]', 'int')
      FROM 
      ( 
        SELECT x = CONVERT(XML, '<i>' 
        + REPLACE(@List, @Delimiter, '</i><i>') + '</i>').query('.')
      ) AS a 
      CROSS APPLY x.nodes('i') AS y(i)
   );
GO

Now your procedure can be:

CREATE PROCEDURE dbo.RetrieveDepartments
  @dept_list VARCHAR(MAX)
AS
BEGIN
  SET NOCOUNT ON;

  ;WITH d AS (SELECT ID = Item FROM dbo.SplitInts(@dept_list, ','))
  SELECT Name FROM dbo.table1 WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM d)
  UNION ALL
  SELECT Name FROM dbo.table2 WHERE ID IN (SELECT ID FROM d)
  -- ...
END
GO
share|improve this answer
    
I know this is what the OP asked (so +1) for but what an unholy mess - Doing it EF would take a 4-line class and a lambda. I can't help thinking this is doing it the hard way for the sake of it. –  Basic Jun 14 '12 at 23:32
    
Hard to some people is simple for others. It's like a lot of things - what works best for you is not necessarily what everyone wants. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 14 '12 at 23:44
    
I understand that - otherwise I wouldn't have +1'd - It's what the OP asked for so it's how you answered, but I'm curious why anyone would opt for this method if if not forced to? I don't see any security benefit (SPs aren't more secure than parameterised Qs), There's possible benefit in performance as the execution plan is re-used but that can also be done more readably/with less code using compiled queries, etc... Is this how you'd do it by choice? If so, do you mind telling me why? Perhaps I'm just missing something –  Basic Jun 14 '12 at 23:51
    
Because I optimize at the database level, and want to be able to do that even after the app is deployed, without having to recompile and redeploy the app. It's also nice if multiple apps share functionality they can call the same stored procedure, instead of each having to have their own copy of the same SQL query (and the middle tier, and validation, etc. etc.). It's pretty simple really and (for me, at least) has nothing to do with security or plan re-use (though the latter can be a serious issue with early versions of Linq to SQL). One other reason: there are a lot of things that you can do –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 14 '12 at 23:54
    
in a stored procedure that EF and other ORM stuff just doesn't translate well. Someone the other day was trying to convert a right join, and some EF expert said "you can't do that; rewrite it as a left join." I don't know if that's true or not, but I have seen many occasions on StackOverflow where EF / Linq etc. produced significant roadblocks to common problems that are trivial to solve in T-SQL but that these "helpful" relationship builders don't understand. –  Aaron Bertrand Jun 14 '12 at 23:55

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