Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

a.h

#include "logic.h"
...

class A
{
friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, A&);
...
};

logic.cpp

#include "a.h"
...
ostream& logic::operator<<(ostream& os, A& a)
{
...
}
...

When i compile, it says:

std::ostream& logic::operator<<(std::ostream&, A&)' must take exactly one argument.

What is the problem?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 44 down vote accepted

The problem is that you define it inside the class, which a) means the second argument is implicit (this) and b) it will not do what you want it do, namely extend std::ostream. You have to define it as a free function:

class A { /* ... */ };
std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream&, const A& a);
share|improve this answer
3  
Also, he declares it as a friend function, and defines it as a member function. –  asaelr May 24 '12 at 20:50

A friend function is not a member function, so the problem is that you declare operator<< as a friend of A:

 friend ostream& operator<<(ostream&, A&);

then try to define it as a member function of the class logic

 ostream& logic::operator<<(ostream& os, A& a)
          ^^^^^^^

Are you confused about whether logic is a class or a namespace?

The error is because you've tried to define a member operator<< taking two arguments, which means it takes three arguments including the implicit this parameter. The operator can only take two arguments, so that when you write a << b the two arguments are a and b.

You want to define ostream& operator<<(ostream&, const A&) as a non-member function, definitely not as a member of logic since it has nothing to do with that class!

std::ostream& operator<<(std::ostream& os, const A& a)
{
  return os << a.number;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.