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I've got a problem with type casting from base class to derived (I'm casting because I'm sure that object is that exact type). here's my code (simplified):

class MyCollection 
{
public:
 Element* Get(int i) {
  return elements[i]; 
 }
 void Add(Element* element) {
   //finding i
   elements[i] = element;
 }
private:
 Element* elements[100]; 
}

class Element {
 public:
  int ID; 
}

class SpecialElement : public Element 
{
public:
 SpecialElement(char* name) { 
   this-> Name = name; 
 }
 char* GetName() { return Name; }
private:
 char* Name; 
}

Now when I'm add to MyCollection object of SpecialElement when I put breakpoint at the moment of adding and cast my argument of Add method in Immediate Window and call GetName method it return me Name of object, but when I do something like this:

void main() {
 MyCollection coll = new MyCollection();
 coll.Add(new SpecialElement("MyName"));
 SpecialElement* foundElement = (SpecialElement*)coll->Get(0); 
 foundElement->GetName(); //Error
}

I'm wondering why is that? Isn't founded object of type SpecialElement?

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5  
Don't use void main(): www2.research.att.com/~bs/bs_faq2.html#void-main –  chris May 24 '12 at 21:19
1  
Way overuse of dynamic allocation. And bad use of strings. And abuse of points. –  Puppy May 24 '12 at 21:21
3  
The collection smells like slicing all over... –  K-ballo May 24 '12 at 21:21
1  
What is slicing? –  Sachin Kainth May 24 '12 at 21:22
3  
Clean up the example code so it compiles (e.g. not mixing pointers and objects, etc.). Right now it's impossible to tell what is a "real" error amidst all the "fake" typo-type errors. –  tmpearce May 24 '12 at 21:24

3 Answers 3

 Element* Get(int i) {
  return elements[i]; 
 }
 void Add(Element* element) {
   //finding i
   elements[i] = element;
 }

How does this even compile? You're assigning an Element* to an Element, and vice versa, but they are entirely different things. Your whole logic is nonsensical.

You're over-using dynamic allocation, assuming reference semantics, and bad char* strings. Get a C++ book.

Also, this class already exists- it's std::array<Element*, 100>. Or std::vector<Element*>, if you want dynamic size.

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You're casting it to base Element and thereby slicing your SpecialElement object. The cast back to the original type, from your base Element has lost the data Name as that is not part of the base.

AFAIK, you cannot do what you're trying to do.

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He can do it, but this storage array needs to contain pointers (i.g. Element* elements[100] rather than Element elements[100]) to avoid slicing. –  Mud May 24 '12 at 21:26

You should use Element* elements[100]; and update your code appropriately, otherwise using object assignment instead of pointer assignment kills polymorphism.

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