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Example:

help([[1, 2, 2], [1, 1, 2]])

should returns 2.

def help(num):
    lst = ()
    for n in num:  
        return(len(lst))

So I need the sum of all numbers in the table.

Another example:

help([[32, 12, 52, 63], [32, 64, 67, 52], [64, 64, 17, 34], [34, 17, 76, 32]]) 

returns: 9

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1  
So you want the sum of the number of unique values on each row, not unique through the whole table? Or the count of unique values in the whole table? Or the number of rows with unique values? Your example does not clarify. –  Silas Ray May 24 '12 at 21:43
1  
You need to be a bit clearer in either your question or your examples, otherwise we can't understand what you're trying to do. –  André Terra May 24 '12 at 21:43
2  
please don't shadow the built-in function help! –  moooeeeep May 24 '12 at 21:45
    
sum of unique values in the entire table. here is another example: help([[32, 12, 52, 63], [32, 64, 67, 52], [64, 64, 17, 34], [34, 17, 76, 32]]) returns: 9 –  shme May 24 '12 at 21:51
    
thank you for all the help everone –  shme May 24 '12 at 22:33

5 Answers 5

def allElementsInTable(table):
    for row in table:
        for elem in row:
            yield elem

Demo:

>>> set(allElementsInTable([[1,2,2],[1,1,2]]))
{1,2}

>>> len(set(allElementsInTable([[1,2,2],[1,1,2]])))
2

If you do lots of table manipulation, you may wish to look into numpy arrays.

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Try this (itertools.chain used to "concatenate" the iterables):

table = [ [32, 12, 52, 63], 
          [32, 64, 67, 52], 
          [64, 64, 17, 34], 
          [34, 17, 76, 32] ]

from itertools import chain
n_unique_values = len(set( chain(*table) ))

print n_unique_values # prints 9
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>>> x = [[1, 2, 2], [1, 1, 2]]
>>> unique_items = lambda n: len(set(n))
>>> map(unique_items, x)
[2, 2]
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@garnertb is of course correct, but for the fun of Python:

>>> x = [[1, 2, 2], [1, 1, 2]]
>>> map(len, map(set, x))
[2, 2]

EDIT: A problem with this and other solutions on this page is that it scales badly if x becomes long. I would be tempted to:

>>> import itertools
>>> itertools.imap(len, itertools.imap(set, x))
<itertools.imap object at 0xb7437b8c>
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stackoverflow.com/a/10745710/711085 does not scale badly if x is large, nor do some other solutions –  ninjagecko May 24 '12 at 22:04
compound_list = []
for sublist in lists:
    compound_list += sublist
len(set(compound_list))
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