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I have a table similar to the following example that is extracted from the use of ODBC logging with IIS for a content management system.

logtime                                    username                operation     target         parameters


2012-05-24 18:13:23.000           -                          GET           /beta.pptx     title=home
2012-05-24 18:13:14.000           -                          GET            /index.php     -
2012-05-24 18:13:09.000     domain\joeh              GET           /css.php          -

What I am trying to find out is who is downloading what documents (like PPTX and DOCX files). Since the rows where target contains the PPTX or DOCX file names don't have the respective username, I'm figuring I can trace backwards in the table from the logtime to find the next row that has a username entry other than "-" to join with the row that has the PPTX or DOCX file listed. In my testing this seems to be accurate. So how can I go about creating a select statement of sorts that will allow me to accomplish this?

I think I got it going with the following which shows the date stamp and only one instance of the exact filename per user per day:

SELECT DISTINCT
v.username
, v.logdate 
, SUBSTRING(v.target, CASE WHEN CHARINDEX('=', v.target) > 0 THEN CHARINDEX('=', v.target)+1 ELSE LEN(v.target) END, LEN(v.target)) as 'fileName'

FROM ( select (select Top 1 temp2.username from InternetLog as temp2 where temp2.logtime <= temp.logtime and temp2.username != '-' order by temp2.logtime desc) as username, LEFT(CONVERT(DATETIME, temp.logtime, 101), 11) AS logdate, temp.target from InternetLog as temp where (RIGHT(RTRIM(temp.target),4) = 'docx' or RIGHT(RTRIM(temp.target),4) = 'pptx') ) AS v WHERE v.username LIKE '%johnd%' order by logdate desc

share|improve this question
    
I don't know that I think your title is quite just about long enough to start thinking about describing the type of issue you are interested in thinking about solving. –  Aaron Bertrand May 24 '12 at 23:42
    
I'm open to any suggestions on what you think a better title would be. I don't think it's something that can be easily summarized and it should hopefully attract the SQL gurus regardless. –  techguy817 May 25 '12 at 13:10
    
How about 'Match pattern in different column from previous row(s)'? –  Aaron Bertrand May 25 '12 at 13:15
    
I've gone ahead and adjusted the title. Hopefully this will be clearer, though I think Kyra's response is close to what I am looking for. –  techguy817 May 25 '12 at 19:22
    
Thanks, that's much less of a mouthful. :-) –  Aaron Bertrand May 25 '12 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

DECLARE @documents TABLE (DocumentName varchar(50))
DECLARE @downloads TABLE (target varchar(50))

INSERT @documents SELECT 'test.pptx'
INSERT @documents SELECT 'test2.pptx'
INSERT @downloads SELECT '/test.pptx'


SELECT *
FROM @documents doc
  INNER JOIN @downloads dwn ON dwn.target LIKE '%' + doc.DocumentName + '%'
share|improve this answer
declare @temp table (logtime smalldatetime, username varchar(10), target varchar(10))
insert into @temp(logtime, username, target)
 values('2012-05-24 14:13:23.000', 'name', 'df'),
        ('2012-05-24 16:13:23.000', '-', 'sdf'),
        ('2012-05-24 18:13:23.000', '-', 'DOCX'),
        ('2012-05-24 19:13:23.000', 'sdfsdf', 'sdf'),
        ('2012-05-24 19:15:23.000', '-', 'PPTX')

select 
    (select Top 1 temp2.username
        from @temp as temp2 
        where temp2.logtime<temp.logtime 
              and temp2.username != '-' 
        order by temp2.logtime desc) as username, 
    temp.logtime, 
    temp.target 
from @temp as temp 
where temp.target like '%DOCX%' or temp.target like '%PPTX%' 
order by temp.logtime 

Gives the results:

(5 row(s) affected)
username   logtime                 target
---------- ----------------------- ----------
name       2012-05-24 18:13:00     DOCX
sdfsdf     2012-05-24 19:15:00     PPTX

(2 row(s) affected)

EDIT If you want to filter your date range by the outer query (and it doesn't matter if you get a username for a id that doesn't match your time and yet the original target/time matches) then add that to the outer where. For the username you will have to change it around more. I haven't test it but maybe something like:

select 
        (select Top 1 temp2.username
    from @temp as temp2 
    where temp2.logtime<temp.logtime 
          and temp2.username != '-' 
    order by temp2.logtime desc) as username, 
        temp.logtime, 
        temp.target 
    from @temp as temp 
    join  (select Top 1 temp2.username
            from @temp as temp2 
            where temp2.logtime<temp.logtime 
                  and temp2.username != '-' 
            order by temp2.logtime desc) as users
         on 1=1
    where (temp.target like '%DOCX%' or temp.target like '%PPTX%') 
          and users.username like '%domain\user%'
          and temp.logtime < @maxtime 
          and temp.logtime > @minTime
    order by temp.logtime 

where max and min time are the datetimes you want to filter by.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Kyra. I've used this example in my situation and it seems to return correctly; however, I'll also need to expand it to the following: 1. Be able to filter by specific usernames from the resultset. I tried "AND like '%domain\user%' but it returned other users as well so maybe I need an outer select of some kind for this? –  techguy817 May 25 '12 at 17:01
    
2. Filter by date range in logtime. –  techguy817 May 25 '12 at 17:18
    
I can look into it later. :) Hopefully this is a good starting point. –  Kyra May 25 '12 at 19:25
    
How about this? –  Kyra May 25 '12 at 20:47
    
I tried to adjust this to my database but it complains about the first "As" and several of the variables. –  techguy817 May 29 '12 at 15:28

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