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I'm having trouble finding an efficient but simple way to check if a list contains another list (retaining order). It's analogous to the string.Contains(string) functionality.

Say I have four collections of ints:

 A = [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]
 B = [2, 3]
 C = [5, 6, 7]
 D = [3, 2, 4]

A.Contains(B) would be true, while A.Contains(C) and A.Contains(D) would be false.

I'd rather not use iterators if it can be helped, but I can't imagine an efficient way to do it; the following code is wildly inefficient.

 public static bool IsSequentiallyEqual<T>(this IEnumerable<T> lhs, IEnumerable<T> rhs)
 {
      return lhs.Zip(rhs, (a, b) => a.Equals(b)).All(isEqual => isEqual == true);
 }

 public static bool StartsWith<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle)
 {
      return haystack.Take(needle.Count()).IsSequentiallyEqual(needle);
 }

 public static bool Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle)
 {
      var result = list.SkipWhile((ele, index) => haystack.Skip(index).StartsWith(needle));
      return result.Count() >= needle.Count();
 }
share|improve this question
    
How many items will you have? (That is to say, is efficiency crucial, or do you just want something that's not very inefficient?) –  minitech May 24 '12 at 23:15
    
It won't be enough to REQUIRE efficiency, but it would be nice –  hehewaffles May 24 '12 at 23:16
2  
    
Is there a way to cleanly implement any of those via LINQ? –  hehewaffles May 24 '12 at 23:48
    
By cleanly do you mean "without cluttering up source code with the required logic?" –  Kevin Stricker May 24 '12 at 23:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted
public static bool Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle)
{
    var hayList = haystack.ToList();
    var needleList = needle.ToList();
    return Enumerable.Range(0, hayList.Count)
                     .Select(start => hayList.Skip(start).Take(needleList.Count))
                     .Any( subsequence => subsequence.SequenceEqual(needleList));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Still O(N^2) but I like this one a lot –  hehewaffles May 25 '12 at 13:17
public static bool Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
 {
      return string.Join("~", first).Contains(string.Join("~", second));
 }

A little bit less "klugy", at least avoid some work for long long lists.

public static bool Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T> first, IEnumerable<T> second)
   {
       //trying to avoid multiple enumeration
        var firstList = first.ToList();
        var secondList = second.ToList();

        if (!secondList.Any(firstList.Contains)) return false;
        if (secondList.Count() > firstList.Count()) return false;
        if (Math.Max(firstList.Count(), secondList.Count()) > 99999)
             throw new ShouldNotUseThisUglyMethodException("I'm too kludgy to be used. Let me die...");
        return string.Join("~", firstList).Contains(string.Join("~", secondList));
    }
share|improve this answer
    
That seems awfully klugy, but it works, thanks –  hehewaffles May 24 '12 at 23:28
    
If you want less kludgy than this, use .ToArray() on your lists then use a similar algorithm as String.Contains() ;) –  Kevin Stricker May 24 '12 at 23:32

This version uses a queue to store the possible subsequences. It only iterates through haystack once aside from the initial Take(), and it stops iterating once it finds a match. However, it mutates variables in a LINQ statement.

public static bool Contains<T>(this IEnumerable<T> haystack, IEnumerable<T> needle)
{
    var needleList = needle.ToList();
    var queue = new Queue<T>(haystack.Take(needleList.Count - 1));
    return haystack.Skip(needleList.Count - 1)
                   .Any( hay =>   
                       {
                           queue.Enqueue(hay);
                           bool areEqual = queue.SequenceEqual(needleList);
                           queue.Dequeue();
                           return areEqual;
                       });  
}
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Use the work of hashes. Note there are some checks which could be done to immediately return a false, but I only show the meat of the process. Here it is in handy extension format:

Updated to Handle Order

void Main()
{
    var first        = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 5 };
    var firstInOrder = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 };
    var second       = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
    var third        = new List<int>() { 1, 10, 20 };

    Console.WriteLine( first.FoundInOther( second ) );        // False
    Console.WriteLine( firstInOrder.FoundInOther( second ) ); // True
    Console.WriteLine( first.FoundInOther( third ) );         // False

}

public static class NumberExtensions
{

    public static bool FoundInOther( this IEnumerable<int> initial, IEnumerable<int> other )
    {
        int index = -1;
        var asDictionary = other.ToDictionary( itm => itm, itm => ++index );

        index = -1;
        return initial.All( oth => asDictionary.ContainsKey( oth ) && (asDictionary[oth] == ++index));
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
Try with var fourth = new List<int>() { 5, 2 }; Your method returns true, when I'd like it to return false (the order is important). –  hehewaffles May 24 '12 at 23:44
    
@hehewaffles Done see example. Simply put in the index into container of the KVP. –  OmegaMan May 25 '12 at 15:08
    
It still only tests the beginning of the sequence. For example, {2, 3} should be found in {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}. –  Risky Martin May 25 '12 at 17:12

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