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I'm trying to construct a query that's driving me crazy. I had no idea where to start with solving it, but after searching around a bit I started playing with subqueries. Now I'm at the point where I'm not sure if that will solve my issue or, if it will, how to create one that does what I want.

Here's a very simplistic view of my current table (call it tbl_1):

---------------------------------
|  row |  name  |  other_names  |
|-------------------------------|
|   1  |   A    |    B, C       |
|   2  |   B    |    C          |
|   3  |   A    |    C          |
|   4  |   D    |    E          |
|   5  |   C    |    A, B       |
---------------------------------

Some of the items I'm working with have multiple names (brand names, names in other countries, code names, etc.), but ultimately all of those different names refer to the same item. I originally was running a search query along the lines of:

SELECT * FROM tbl_1
WHERE name LIKE '%A%'
OR other_names LIKE '%A%';

Which would return rows 1 and 3. However, I quickly realized that my query should also return row 2, as A = B = C. How would I go about doing something like that? I'm open to alternative suggestions outside of a fancy query, such as constructing another table that somehow combines all the names into one row, but I figure something like that would be error prone or inefficient.

Additionally, I'm running MySQL 5.5.23 using InnoDB with other code written in PHP and Python.

Thanks!

Update 5/26/12:
I went back to my original thinking of using a subquery, but right when I thought I was getting somewhere I ran into a documented MySQL issue where the query is evaluated from the outside in and my subquery will be evaluated for every row and won't finish in a realistic amount of time. Here's what I was attempting to do:

SELECT * FROM tbl_1
WHERE name = ANY
    (SELECT name FROM tbl_1 WHERE other_names LIKE '%A%' or name LIKE '%A%')
OR other_names = ANY 
    (SELECT name FROM tbl_1 WHERE other_names LIKE '%A%' or name LIKE '%A%')

Which returns what I want using the example table, but the aforementioned MySQL issue/bug causes the subquery to be considered a dependent query rather than an independent one. As a result, I haven't been able to test the query on my real table (~250,000 rows) as it eventually times out.

I've read that the main workaround for the issue is to use joins rather than subqueries, but I'm not sure how I would apply that to what I'm trying to do. The more I think about it, I might be better off running the subqueries independently using PHP/Python and using the resulting arrays to craft the main query that I want. However, I still think there is the potential to miss some results because the terms in the columns aren't nearly as nice as my example (some of the terms are multiple words, some have parenthesis, the other names aren't necessarily comma-separated, etc).

Alternatively, I'm thinking about constructing a separate table that will build the necessary links, something like:

| 1 | A | B, C|
| 2 | B | C, A|
| 3 | C | A, B|

but I think that's a lot easier said than done considering the data I'm working with and the non-standardized format in which it exists.

The route that I'm strongly considering at the point is to build a separate table with the links that are easily constructed (i.e. 1:1 ratio for name:other_names) so I don't have to deal with the formatting issues that exist in the other_names column. I may also eliminate/limit the use of LIKE and require users to know at least one exact name in order to simplify the results and probably increase the overall performance.

In conclusion, I hate working with input data that I have no control over.

share|improve this question
    
just trying to understand the table structure, if B is actually just another name for A than why it has a separate row (Row 2) ? –  coder May 25 '12 at 7:50
    
@coder The data in the rows is populated by users who don't necessarily know all of the names for something. More specifically, these names refer to pharmaceutical products. A person may know that Incivek = telaprevir in the US and input it as such (Incivek in name, telaprevir in other_names), but it's also called Incivo in Europe. As such, a person may be searching for 'Incivek', but it should also pull up results for Incivo as well. –  Tim May 26 '12 at 0:13

2 Answers 2

Stumbled on this question by accident, so i don't know if my suggestion is relevant, but this looks like good usage for something like an "union-find".

The SELECT would be extremely easy and fast. But the insert & update is relativly complex and you will probably need an in-code loop (while updated rows > 0)... and several databse calls

Example for the table:

---------------------------
|  row |  name  |  group  |
|-------------------------|
|   1  |   A    |    1    |
|   2  |   B    |    1    |
|   4  |   C    |    1    |
|   5  |   D    |    2    |
|   6  |   X    |    1    |
|   7  |   Z    |    2    |
---------------------------

selecting: SELECT name FROM tbl WHERE group = (SELECT group FROM tbl WHERE name LIKE '%A%')


inserting relation K = T: (psedu codeish..)

SELECT group as gk WHERE name = K; SELECT group as gt WHERE name = T;

if (gk empty result) and (gt empty result) insert both with new group

---------------------------
|  row |  name  |  group  |
|-------------------------|
|   1  |   A    |    1    |
|   2  |   B    |    1    |
|   4  |   C    |    1    |
|   5  |   D    |    2    |
|   6  |   X    |    1    |
|   7  |   Z    |    2    |
|   8  |   K    |    3    |
|   9  |   T    |    3    |
---------------------------

if (gk empty result) and (gt NOT empty result) insert t with group = gx.group

---------------------------
|  row |  name  |  group  |
|-------------------------|
|   1  |   A    |    1    |
|   2  |   B    |    1    |
|   4  |   C    |    1    |
|   5  |   D    |    2    |
|   6  |   X    |    1    |
|   7  |   Z    |    2    |
|   8  |   K    |    2    |
|   9  |   T    |    2    |
---------------------------

(the same in the other case)

and when both not empty, update one group to be the other

UPDATE tbl1 SET group = gt WHERE group = gk

share|improve this answer

I can't think of a query, that supports unlimited depth of name identity. But if you could work with a limited number of "recursions", you might consider using a query similar to this, starting with the query you provided, you retrieve all rows with name identities:

SELECT a.* FROM tbl_1 a
WHERE a.name='A'
OR a.other_names LIKE '%A%'
UNION
SELECT b.* FROM tbl_1 a
JOIN tbl_1 b ON a.other_names LIKE '%' || b.name || '%' OR b.other_names LIKE '%' || a.name || '%'
WHERE a.name='A'
OR a.other_names LIKE '%A%';

This query would return row 2, but it wouldn't return any additional rows having "B" as "other_name" in your example. So you would have to union another query:

SELECT a.* FROM tbl_1 a
WHERE a.name='A'
OR a.other_names LIKE '%A%'
UNION
SELECT b.* FROM tbl_1 a
JOIN tbl_1 b ON a.other_names LIKE '%' || b.name || '%' OR b.other_names LIKE '%' || a.name || '%'
WHERE a.name='A'
OR a.other_names LIKE '%A%';
UNION
SELECT c.* FROM tbl_1 a
JOIN tbl_1 b ON (a.other_names LIKE '%' || b.name || '%' OR b.other_names LIKE '%' || a.name || '%')
JOIN tbl_1 c ON (b.other_names LIKE '%' || c.name || '%' OR c.other_names LIKE '%' || b.name || '%')
WHERE a.name='A'
OR a.other_names LIKE '%A%';

As you can see, the query would grow and accelerate rapidly with increasing depth, and it also isn't what I would call beautiful. But it might fit your needs. I'm not very experienced working with MySQL functions, but I guess you would be able to create a more elegant solution also working with unlimited depth using those. You might also consider solving the problem programmatically with Python.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That doesn't really solve my issue due to practical issues (my table has over 200,000 rows), but your mention of recursion made me quickly realize how difficult this could actually be. At this point I think I'm going to try using python to play with the input data and create a separate table with all of the proper links. –  Tim May 26 '12 at 0:23

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