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When I run the following code in debug mode, it'll successfully finish and exit. However, if I run the following code in release mode, it'll get stuck in an infinite loop and never finish.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    bool stop = false;

    new Thread(() =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        stop = true;
        Console.WriteLine("Set \"stop\" to true.");

    }).Start();

    Console.WriteLine("Entering loop.");

    while (!stop)
    {
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Done.");
}

Which optimization is causing it to get stuck in an infinite loop?

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Is there no need to synchronize the access to stop between the threads? –  Uwe Keim May 25 '12 at 4:20
    
That is causes by some optimation stuff. The compile will build a true instat of stop. –  rekire May 25 '12 at 4:21
    
Take a look at the new CancellationToken classes. They were invented to solve this issue. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd997364.aspx –  Martin Brown May 25 '12 at 12:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

My guess would be processor caching of the stop variable on the main thread. In debug mode the memory model is stricter because the debugger needs to be able to provide a sensible view of the variable's state across all threads.

Try making a field and marking it as volatile:

volatile bool stop = false;

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    new Thread(() =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        stop = true;
        Console.WriteLine("Set \"stop\" to true.");

    }).Start();

    Console.WriteLine("Entering loop.");

    while (!stop)
    {
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Done.");
}
share|improve this answer
    
Volatile is good for correctness, but to avoid optimization it look like making it field instead of local variable is enough. –  Alexei Levenkov May 25 '12 at 4:50
    
@AlexeiLevenkov I could be mistaken but I believe that is an implementation detail of the CLR, and theoretically (though probably not practically) subject to change. –  Chris Shain May 25 '12 at 4:57
    
I wonder why you are not synchronizing the access to the variable. I always do this, since I assume it is not an atomic operation to get/set a bool variable. Am I wrong on this? –  Uwe Keim May 25 '12 at 5:06
1  
I think it's going to be quite hard to figure out a sensible non-atomic way to set or get a boolean variable... Caching (either by the CPU or the compiler itself) is the cause for this. –  zmbq May 25 '12 at 6:01
2  
@UweKeim: get/set of a bool is definitely atomic. It's in the spec. stackoverflow.com/questions/9666/… –  lonewolf May 25 '12 at 6:37

Because it's not thread safe you update the main thread variable stop inside the child thread. It will always be unpredictable. To work with any situation like this, have a look on this article.

The volatile keyword instructs the compiler to generate an acquire-fence on every read from that field, and a release-fence on every write to that field. An acquire-fence prevents other reads/writes from being moved before the fence; a release-fence prevents other reads/writes from being moved after the fence. These “half-fences” are faster than full fences because they give the runtime and hardware more scope for optimization.

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Thread Unsafe code is unpredictable. Main problem is changing one thread variable from another thread. Make the variable global or volatile. You can do it by following

static volatile bool stop = false;

static void Main(string[] args)
{    
    new Thread(() =>
    {
        Thread.Sleep(1000);
        stop = true;
        Console.WriteLine("Set \"stop\" to true.");

    }).Start();

    Console.WriteLine("Entering loop.");

    while (!stop)
    {
    }

    Console.WriteLine("Done.");
}
share|improve this answer

Looks like some sort of optimization for value of local variable - changing to a field make it terminate ok (note that volatile or correct locking should be used in actual code):

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Program
{
    static bool stop = false;
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        new Thread(() =>
        {
            Thread.Sleep(1000);
            stop = true;
            Console.WriteLine("Set \"stop\" to true.");

        }).Start();

        Console.WriteLine("Entering loop.");

        while (!stop)
        {
        }

        Console.WriteLine("Done.");
    }
}
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