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I want to add the oracle jdbc driver to my project as dependency (runtime scope) - ojdbc14. In MVNrepository site the dependency to put in the POM is:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
    <artifactId>ojdbc14</artifactId>
    <version>10.2.0.3.0</version>
</dependency>

of course this does't work as it is not in the central repository used by maven. 2 questions:

  1. How do I find a repository (if any) that contains this artifact?

  2. How do I add it so that Maven will use it?

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ojdbc6 in public maven repository: stackoverflow.com/questions/9898499/… –  Vadzim Sep 11 '13 at 15:27

9 Answers 9

up vote 228 down vote accepted

How do I find a repository (if any) that contains this artifact?

Unfortunately due the binary license there is no public repository with the Oracle Driver JAR. This happens with many dependencies but is not Maven's fault. If you happen to find a public repository containing the JAR you can be sure that is illegal.

How do I add it so that Maven will use it?

Some JARs that can't be added due to license reasons have a pom entry in the Maven Central repo. Just check it out, it contains the vendor's preferred Maven info:

<groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
<artifactId>ojdbc14</artifactId>
<version>10.2.0.3.0</version>

...and the URL to download the file which in this case is http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/tech/java/sqlj_jdbc/index.html.

Once you've downloaded the JAR just add it to your computer repository with (note I pulled the groupId, artifactId and version from the POM):

mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc14 \
     -Dversion=10.2.0.3.0 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=ojdbc.jar -DgeneratePom=true

The last parameter for generating a POM will save you from pom.xml warnings

If your team has a local Maven repository this guide might be helpful to upload the JAR there.

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64  
It would have been nice if oracle could host a maven repo with their jars... –  AmanicA Nov 29 '10 at 13:35
1  
Those are not lines in settings.xml but a command, once you have the JAR that command will add it to your local repository –  victor hugo Jul 14 '11 at 22:36
55  
@AmanicA, it's hard to use "Oracle" and "nice" in the same sentence... –  Daniel Serodio Nov 9 '11 at 13:29
9  
For OJDBC6: 1. mvn install:install-file -DgroupId=com.oracle -DartifactId=ojdbc6 -Dversion=11.2.0.3 -Dpackaging=jar -Dfile=ojdbc6.jar -DgeneratePom=true 2. Add this to pom.xml: <dependency> <groupId>com.oracle</groupId> <artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId> <version>11.2.0.3</version> </dependency> –  oskarae Dec 27 '11 at 16:06
1  
I wander why Oracle is so ugly that it doesn't care of all public judgements it has. It is bad even in these small things like public availability of their own FREE libraries. –  Askar Kalykov Apr 11 at 7:51

For whatever reason, I could not get any of the above solutions to work. (Still can't.)

What I did instead was to include the jar in my project (blech) and then create a "system" dependency for it that indicates the path to the jar. It's probably not the RIGHT way to do it, but it does work. And it eliminates the need for the other developers on the team (or the guy setting up the build server) to put the jar in their local repositories.

UPDATE: This solution works for me when I run Hibernate Tools. It does NOT appear to work for building the WAR file, however. It doesn't include the ojdbc6.jar file in the target WAR file.

1) Create a directory called "lib" in the root of your project.

2) Copy the ojdbc6.jar file there (whatever the jar is called.)

3) Create a dependency that looks something like this:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
    <artifactId>ojdbc</artifactId>
    <version>14</version>
    <scope>system</scope>
    <systemPath>${basedir}/lib/ojdbc6.jar</systemPath> <!-- must match file name -->
</dependency>

Ugly, but works for me.

To include the files in the war file add the following to your pom

<build>
    <finalName>MyAppName</finalName>
    <plugins>
        <plugin>
            <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
            <artifactId>maven-war-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <webResources>
                    <resource>
                        <directory>${basedir}/src/main/java</directory>
                        <targetPath>WEB-INF/classes</targetPath>
                        <includes>
                            <include>**/*.properties</include>
                            <include>**/*.xml</include>
                            <include>**/*.css</include>
                            <include>**/*.html</include>
                        </includes>
                    </resource>
                    <resource>
                        <directory>${basedir}/lib</directory>
                        <targetPath>WEB-INF/lib</targetPath>
                        <includes>
                            <include>**/*.jar</include>
                        </includes>
                    </resource>
                </webResources>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>

        <plugin>
            <artifactId>maven-compiler-plugin</artifactId>
            <configuration>
                <source>1.6</source>
                <target>1.6</target>
            </configuration>
        </plugin>
  </plugins>
  </build>
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6  
I actually like this solution because it does not require setting up nexus, there are typically only 1 or 2 jars like this in a project, and it simplifies other developers setup on the project because they don't have to update their local .m2 env. (oracle being the prime candidate for this). Also, if you update your source repo with a new oracle jar, all developers get it on next pull. –  Q Boiler Apr 9 '13 at 15:31
    
added info on how to add the jar files to the WAR file –  ojblass Apr 2 at 13:14

Download the jar and place it in your project src/lib. Now you can use the maven installer plugin.

<plugin>
    <groupId>org.apache.maven.plugins</groupId>
    <artifactId>maven-install-plugin</artifactId>
    <version>2.3.1</version>
    <executions>
        <execution>
            <id>install-oracle-jdbc</id>
            <goals>
                <goal>install-file</goal>
            </goals>
            <phase>clean</phase>
            <configuration>
                <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
                <artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
                <version>11.2.0</version>
                <packaging>jar</packaging>
                <generatePom>true</generatePom>
                <createChecksum>true</createChecksum>
                <file>${project.basedir}/src/lib/ojdbc6.jar</file>
            </configuration>
        </execution>
    </executions>
</plugin>

Now you only have to execute mvn clean once and the oracle lib is installed in your local maven repository.

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Question already answered and accepted –  sidgate Apr 5 at 9:13
3  
very useful alternative ! –  Rakesh Waghela Apr 30 at 9:57

You can use Nexus to manage 3rd party dependencies as well as dependencies in standard maven repositories.

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2  
How would nexus help in this case? Where will it download the artifact from? –  ziggy Jan 12 '12 at 16:15
3  
The answer is incomplete, but I think @Michael Munsey is saying to create an internal/corporate repository to download from. –  Randolph May 10 '12 at 22:19
    
Yes. Set up Nexus, then manually download the jars and put them into Nexus so that successive maven builds can pull it from your Nexus instance. –  Michael Munsey Aug 19 '13 at 23:24
    
@MichaelMunsey Generally speaking suggesting a repository manager like Artifactory or Nexus would be a good answer, but in the specific case of Oracle JDBC database drivers, it isn't a good one because, even if it makes things work, it unfortunately expose you to trouble due to this license term violation. –  taringamberini May 19 at 7:14

Up to now, its not possible to use maven repositories. I'm using ivy as dependency management tool, but also use maven2' s ibiblio repositories. And this is working for ivy:

<dependency org="oracle" name="ojdbc14" rev="10.2.0.2" conf="*->default"/>

Maven2' s dependency could be something like that:

<dependency> 
    <groupId>oracle</groupId> 
    <artifactId>ojdbc14</artifactId> 
    <version>10.2.0.2</version> 
</dependency>

Notice that i define http://download.java.net/maven/2/ and http://mirrors.ibiblio.org/pub/mirrors/maven/mule/dependencies/maven2/[organisation]/[module]/[revision]/[artifact]-[revision].[ext] as external maven2 repos on my ivy settings.

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1  
This is a great answer - you can just add the repo: mirrors.ibiblio.org/pub/mirrors/maven/mule/dependencies/maven2 to your pom.xml for this to work. –  Grouchal Jan 3 '12 at 9:18
6  
It might work, but is it legal? As explained in one of the other answers here, Oracle doesn't allow the driver to be distributed by anybody but them and they don't supply a Maven repository. If you use this solution, sometime the driver may be removed from the repository when you least expect it. –  L S Apr 10 '12 at 15:50
    
@Grouchal This answer makes things work but, unfortunately, expose you to trouble due to this license term violation. –  taringamberini May 19 at 7:08

There is one repo that provides the jar. In SBT add a resolver similar to this: "oracle driver repo" at "http://dist.codehaus.org/mule/dependencies/maven2"

and a dependency: "oracle" % "ojdbc14" % "10.2.0.2"

You can do the same with maven. pom.xml and jar are available (http://dist.codehaus.org/mule/dependencies/maven2/oracle/ojdbc14/10.2.0.2/).

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Be careful because this pom http://dist.codehaus.org/mule/dependencies/maven2/oracle/ojdbc14/10.2.0.2/ojdbc‌​14-10.2.0.2.pom has no license definition, so I don't think it was uploaded by the artifact owner. This answer makes things work but, unfortunately, expose you to trouble due to this license term violation. –  taringamberini May 19 at 8:32

Some Oracle Products support publishing maven artifacts to a local repository. The products have a plugin/maven directory which contains descriptions where to find those artifacts and where to store them. There is a Plugin from Oracle which will actually do the upload.

See: http://docs.oracle.com/middleware/1212/core/MAVEN/config_maven.htm

One of the products which may ship OJDBC in this way is the WLS, it uses however quite strange coordinates:

<groupId>com.oracle.weblogic</groupId>
<artifactId>ojdbc6</artifactId>
<version>12.1.2-0-0</version>
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1. How do I find a repository (if any) that contains this artifact?

All Oracle Database JDBC Drivers are distribuited under the OTN License Agreement.

If you read the OTN License Agreement you find this license term:

You may not:
...
- distribute the programs unless accompanied with your applications;
...

so that's why you can't find the driver's jar in any public Maven Repository, because it would be distributed alone, and if it happened it would be a license violation.

Adding the dependency:

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.oracle</groupId>
    <artifactId>ojdbc14</artifactId>
    <version>10.2.0.3.0</version>
</dependency>

(or any later version) make Maven downloads the ojdbc14-10.2.0.3.0.pom only, and in that pom you can read:

...
<licenses>
    <license>
        <name>Oracle Technology Network Development and Distribution License Terms</name>
        <url>http://www.oracle.com/technology/software/htdocs/distlic.html</url>
    </license>
</licenses>
...

which informs you about the OTN License.

2. How do I add it so that Maven will use it?

In order to make the above dependency works I agree with victor hugo who were suggesting you here to manually install the jar into your local Maven repository (the .m2 directory) by running:

mvn install:install-file -Dfile={Path_to_your_ojdbc.jar} -DgroupId=com.oracle 
-DartifactId=ojdbc -Dversion=10.2.0.3.0 -Dpackaging=jar

but I want to add that the license term above doesn't limit only where you can't find the JDBC jar, but it limits where you install it too!

In fact your local Maven repository must be private and not shared because if it was shared it would be a kind of distribution in which the jar is distributed alone, even if to a little group of people into your local area network, and this represent a OTN License Agreement violation.

Moreover I think you should avoid installing the JDBC jar in your corporation repository manager (such as Artifactory or Nexus) as a single artifact because if it was installed it would be still distributed alone, even if to people in your organization only, and this represents a OTN License Agreement violation.

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SOLVED

  • Please do following settings to resolve the error

This repository needs to be enable for finding Oracle 10.0.3.0 dependecies (this setting needs to be done in Buildconfig.groovy grails.project.dependency.resolver = "ivy" // or ivy

Also use following setting for compile time Oracle driver download

runtime "com.oracle:ojdbc:10.2.0.3.0"

This should solve your issue for not finding the Oracle driver for grails application


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