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Following is the shell script to read all the DSF present in the box. But since the line is having spaces, it is displaying them in different lines. For those of you who dont understand ioscan -m dsf, replace it by ls -ltr, then the output is such that the permission and names are displayed in different line, but i want them in the same line.

#!/usr/bin/ksh

for a in `ioscan -m dsf`
do
 echo  $a
done
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2 Answers 2

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The for loop is not designed to loop over lines. The for loop loops over "words", or "fields".

The idiomatic way to loop over lines is to use a while loop in combination with read.

ioscan -m dsf | while read -r line
do
  printf '%s\n' "$line"
done

Note that the while loop is in a subshell because of the pipe. In bash you can work around this by using process substitution.

while read -r line
do
  printf '%s\n' "$line"
done <(ioscan -m dsf)

The for loop splits the values to loop over using the characters in the $IFS (Internal field separator) variable as separators. Usually $IFS contains a space, a tab, and a newline. That means the for loop will loop over the "words", not over the lines.

If you insist on using a for loop to loop over lines you have to change the value of $IFS to only newline. But if you do this you have to save the old value of $IFS and restore that after the loop, because many other things also depend on $IFS.

OLDIFS="$IFS"
IFS=$'\n' # bash specific
for line in $(ioscan -m dsf)
do
  printf '%s\n' "$line"
done
IFS="$OLDIFS"

Alternatively you can use a subshell to contain the change to $IFS:

(
  # changes to variables in the subshell stay in the subshell
  IFS=$'\n'
  for line in $(ioscan -m dsf)
  do
    printf '%s\n' "$line"
  done
)
# $IFS is not changed outside of the subshell

See also:

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The subshell solution is BRILLIANT! Thank you! –  lucaferrario Dec 11 '13 at 23:21

Using for

for l in $() performs word splitting based on IFS:

$ for l in $(printf %b 'a b\nc'); do echo "$l"; done
a
b
c
$ IFS=$'\n'; for l in $(printf %b 'a b\nc'); do echo "$l"; done
a b
c

IFS doesn't have to be set back if it is not used later.

for l in $() also performs pathname expansion:

$ printf %b 'a\n*\n' > file.txt
$ IFS=$'\n'
$ for l in $(<file.txt); do echo "$l"; done
a
file.txt
$ set -f; for l in $(<file.txt); do echo "$l"; done; set +f
a
*

If IFS=$'\n', linefeeds are stripped and collapsed:

$ printf %b '\n\na\n\nb\n\n' > file.txt
$ IFS=$'\n'; for l in $(<file.txt); do echo "$l"; done
a
b

$(cat file.txt) (or $(<file.txt)) also reads the whole file to memory.

Using read

Without -r backslashes are used for line continuation and removed before other characters:

$ cat file.txt
\1\\2\
3
$ cat file.txt | while read l; do echo "$l"; done
1\23
$ cat file.txt | while read -r l; do echo "$l"; done
\1\\2\
3

Characters in IFS are stripped from the start and end of lines but not collapsed:

$ printf %b '1  2 \n\t3\n' | while read -r l; do echo "$l"; done
1  2
3
$ printf %b ' 1  2 \n\t3\n' | while IFS= read -r l; do echo "$l"; done
 1  2 
    3

If the last line doesn't end with a newline, read assigns l to it but exits before the body of the loop:

$ printf 'x\ny' | while read l; do echo $l; done
x
$ printf 'x\ny' | while read l || [[ $l ]]; do echo $l; done
x
y

If a while loop is in a pipeline, it is also in a subshell, so variables are not visible outside it:

$ x=0; seq 3 | while read l; do let x+=l; done; echo $x
0
$ x=0; while read l; do let x+=l; done < <(seq 3); echo $x
6
$ x=0; x=8 | x=9; echo $x
0
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