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I have this code:

public class Tarea implements Runnable
{

    private int valor;


    public Tarea()
    {
         valor = 0;
    }


    public void run()
    {
         for (int i = 1; i <= 10; i++)
         {
             valor++;
         }
         System.out.println(Thread.currentThread().getName() + " Valor " + valor);
    }
}

public class AppTarea
{

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
         Thread[] hilos = new Thread[5];
         for (int i = 0; i < hilos.length; i++)
         {
             hilos[i] = new Thread(new Tarea());
             hilos[i].start();
         }
         System.out.println("Main terminado");
    }
}

Is this Thread safe. Should I define variable valor as volatile. valor is shared in different threads or not? Thanks.

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6 Answers 6

Ans is Yes. Every thread is running in their own context and using the variable "valor".

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Short answer: Yes, this is thread safe.

Long answer: Your code is thread safe as none of the member variables of your threads are shared resources. This means that every thread you create owns a valor member variable. volatile should be used for shared resources to ensure they are synchronized and not cached between threads.

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This is thread safe, since it is only access on the constructor and the run() method, from the same class. The only thread that can use the variable is the running thread, which is synchronized with itself under the java memory model (and actually any memory model I am aware of), so there is no data-race in here. No need for volatile nor synchronized keywords in here.

The volatile keyword is used when you want to modify a variable from multiple threads, and you don't want it to be stored in cache because of it. This is not the case - the variable is modified in here by a single thread.

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1  
Volatile should not be used for cases when you modify the variable. It provides visibility guarantees but not atomicity guarantees. If you use volatile in a compound action you would be burnt by it. Please see ibm.com/developerworks/java/library/j-jtp06197/index.html –  Selim May 25 '12 at 7:39
    
@Selim: The answer does not aim to provide full explanation when you should use a volatile, it only aims to explain why you shouldn't use volatile in this case. I deliberately didn't say anything about it being atomic or not. –  amit May 25 '12 at 7:45
    
@Amit: I see your point that's why I did not downvote it mate. But I do believe the second part "The volatile keyword is used when you want to modify a variable from multiple threads" is not fully correct. –  Selim May 25 '12 at 7:50
    
To be exact volatile should be used when writes to the variable is not dependent on it's current value, or when it can be ensured that only one thread ever updates it. Because it does not have strong synchronization semantics. Therefore, when you say it should be used if you modify it from multiple threads is IMO not correct. –  Selim May 25 '12 at 7:52
    
@Selim: It is correct. However, I agree it is not complete. I believe this part of the volatile behavior is enough to understand why in here - it is not needed. Since SO is about answering specific questions, I did not elaborate it more (where will it end? later explaining why caching is an issue here? and then - what is cache?) –  amit May 25 '12 at 7:54

Your variable is an instance variable and there is a one to one mapping between threads and instances. So each thread has a separate copy of the state. Therefore no synchronization is needed.

If the variable was shared between threads then you would need to synchronize.

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It is thread safe because there is nothing shared.... the variable valor is unique to each thread...

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No it is not shared, it is private variable. There is no way to access it outside the class so it is safe.

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1  
private static v = 1; each thread do v++. No access outside the class, yet not safe. –  UmNyobe May 25 '12 at 7:16
    
@UmNyobe: This is uncalled for. I have answered the question asked not another hypothetical question. There are many other situations which could have broken the classes thread safety but in this particular example there is no danger. There is no static modifier on the variable valor. –  Selim May 25 '12 at 7:19
    
"There is no way to access it outside the class so it is safe.". This assertion is absolutely false.. –  UmNyobe May 25 '12 at 7:21
1  
@UmNyobe is making the point that, whilst your conclusion is accurate, the reasoning is not. And that's crucial when doing threaded programming. Static analysis plays a more crucial role for threaded programming issue. –  David Heffernan May 25 '12 at 7:22
    
Guys, I understand your point, but the variable is not static. In we go in that vein, volatile does not have strong enough synchronization as well. What I mean is, you are right from a conceptual perspective, but I only answered the question with respect to the example. –  Selim May 25 '12 at 7:29

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