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Server sends me time like this:

2012-06-08 17:00:00 +0100

I need to change it like HH:MM based on local time. For example this time is what time at Japan, India, US and etc.

How can I do this? Thanks

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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Option 1: using java.util.Date/Calendar:

First you need to parse the value to a Date, then reformat it in the format and time zone you're interested in:

SimpleDateFormat inputFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss z",
                                                    Locale.US);
Date date = inputFormat.parse(inputText);

// Potentially use the default locale. This will use the local time zone already.
SimpleDateFormat outputFormat = new SimpleDateFormat("HH:mm", Locale.US);
String outputText = outputFormat.format(date);

Option 2: using Joda Time

Joda Time is a much better date/time library for Java.

DateTimeFormatter inputFormatter = DateTimeFormat
    .forPattern("yyyy-MM-dd HH:mm:ss Z")
    .withLocale(Locale.US);

DateTime parsed = inputFormatter.parseDateTime(inputText);

DateTimeFormatter outputFormatter = DateTimeFormat
    .forPattern("HH:mm")
    .withLocale(Locale.US)
    .withZone(DateTimeZone.getDefault());

String outputText = outputFormatter.print(parsed);

Note that you should only convert to/from string representations when you really need to. Otherwise, use the most appropriate type based on your usage - this is where Joda Time really shines.

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thanks Jon for your help, I used Joda. You are awesome :) –  Hesam May 25 '12 at 7:58
    
+1 helpful for me. –  Addicted May 25 '12 at 9:44
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java.util.Date is always in UTC. What makes you think it's in local time? I suspect the problem is that you're displaying it via an instance of Calendar which uses the local timezone, or possibly using Date.toString() which also uses the local timezone.

If this isn't the problem, please post some sample code.

I would, however, recommend that you use Joda Time anyway, which offers a much clearer API.

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Use DateFormat class. Add the Calendar (which is equivalent, but better than Date, since Date class is mostly deprecated) to the DateFormat and set the time zone.

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Use JodaTime. It's far better and safer than Java's Date and Time API. There are a lot of methods that return a LocalTime object (HH:MM).

As an example, new DateTime(your date time).toLocalTime();

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