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I am have a problem with undestanding some sentence at PHP.net about the static keyword, At This Link, PHP.net Explaining about the static keyword i did understand all they say but i didn't succeed to get one sentence witch start at "Like any other PHP static variable". I just didn't get it if can some one please help me with code example, mabye explanation will be great.

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Thank You Guy's i am reading now. –  Blanktext May 25 '12 at 8:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

When saying "like any other static variable" the manual refers to a static variable inside a function. The archetypal example is the function that keeps an internal counter:

function foo() {
    static $counter = 0; // static variable
    return ++$counter;
}

Static variables like this and static class properties both have a limitation on the expressions you can initialize them with.

function foo() {
    static $counter = getInitialValue(); // ERROR: not possible!
    return ++$counter;
}

If you need to do something like this, the usual workaround is

function foo() {
    static $counter; // not initialized explicitly, same as = null
    if ($counter === null) { // three equals!
        $counter = getInitialValue();
    }
    return ++$counter;
}
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Thank you for your answer i understand it if you can please explain what was happen if you were using two equals, i know the Difference between two to three but can you explain the difference please at this case. –  Blanktext May 25 '12 at 8:23
    
@Blanktext: There is no special difference in this case. I 'm just avoiding situations where $counter would be initialized to e.g. 0, we wouldn't want to reset it every time. –  Jon May 25 '12 at 8:29
    
Thank you Very Much Jon, i understand it all now, Have a nice day. –  Blanktext May 25 '12 at 8:39

Basically, you can do this:

class Foo
{
    public static $my_static = 'foo';

    public function staticValue() {
        return self::$my_static;
    }
}

where $my_static is initialise as a string with the value foo. But you can't do:

class Foo
{
    public static $my_static = substr('food',0,3);

    public function staticValue() {
        return self::$my_static;
    }
}

and expect $my_static to contain the results of the function call to substr; directly assigning a function's return value to a static variable is an illegal operation. Similarly, you can't do:

class Foo
{
    public static $my_static = 'foo';
    public static $my_static_2 = $my_static;

    public function staticValue() {
        return self::$my_static;
    }
}

because you may not initialise a static variable by pointing to another variable.

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