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I don't have .NET 4.5 installed (and I can't install it).

Where can I find the source code of the new System.Progress<T> class ?

(Or someone kind enough, with the .NET 4.5 beta installed, to copy/paste the code)

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install 4.5, install demo of reflector or ilspy and et voila ... –  Andreas Niedermair May 25 '12 at 7:53
    
I know, but I can't install it (I've edited my question) –  bbaia May 25 '12 at 8:03
1  
super requirement ... lol ... no chance for any other computer you can (ab)use for this? –  Andreas Niedermair May 25 '12 at 8:03
    
you probabbly are seacrhing for job scheduler. In this case may be Quartz.NET can help you. –  Tigran May 25 '12 at 8:05
    
btw - you can link your visual studio to the symbol-servers and step through the implementation .. –  Andreas Niedermair May 25 '12 at 8:05
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2 Answers

Here is the output from ILSpy:

using System;
using System.Runtime;
using System.Threading;
namespace System
{
    [__DynamicallyInvokable]
    public class Progress<T> : IProgress<T>
    {
        private readonly SynchronizationContext m_synchronizationContext;
        private readonly Action<T> m_handler;
        private readonly SendOrPostCallback m_invokeHandlers;
        [__DynamicallyInvokable]
        public event EventHandler<T> ProgressChanged
        {
            [__DynamicallyInvokable]
            add
            {
                EventHandler<T> eventHandler = this.ProgressChanged;
                EventHandler<T> eventHandler2;
                do
                {
                    eventHandler2 = eventHandler;
                    EventHandler<T> value2 = (EventHandler<T>)Delegate.Combine(eventHandler2, value);
                    eventHandler = Interlocked.CompareExchange<EventHandler<T>>(ref this.ProgressChanged, value2, eventHandler2);
                }
                while (eventHandler != eventHandler2);
            }
            [__DynamicallyInvokable]
            remove
            {
                EventHandler<T> eventHandler = this.ProgressChanged;
                EventHandler<T> eventHandler2;
                do
                {
                    eventHandler2 = eventHandler;
                    EventHandler<T> value2 = (EventHandler<T>)Delegate.Remove(eventHandler2, value);
                    eventHandler = Interlocked.CompareExchange<EventHandler<T>>(ref this.ProgressChanged, value2, eventHandler2);
                }
                while (eventHandler != eventHandler2);
            }
        }
        [__DynamicallyInvokable]
        public Progress()
        {
            this.m_synchronizationContext = (SynchronizationContext.CurrentNoFlow ?? ProgressStatics.DefaultContext);
            this.m_invokeHandlers = new SendOrPostCallback(this.InvokeHandlers);
        }
        [__DynamicallyInvokable]
        public Progress(Action<T> handler) : this()
        {
            if (handler == null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentNullException("handler");
            }
            this.m_handler = handler;
        }
        [__DynamicallyInvokable]
        protected virtual void OnReport(T value)
        {
            Action<T> handler = this.m_handler;
            EventHandler<T> progressChanged = this.ProgressChanged;
            if (handler != null || progressChanged != null)
            {
                this.m_synchronizationContext.Post(this.m_invokeHandlers, value);
            }
        }
        [__DynamicallyInvokable, TargetedPatchingOptOut("Performance critical to inline this type of method across NGen image boundaries")]
        void IProgress<T>.Report(T value)
        {
            this.OnReport(value);
        }
        private void InvokeHandlers(object state)
        {
            T t = (T)((object)state);
            Action<T> handler = this.m_handler;
            EventHandler<T> progressChanged = this.ProgressChanged;
            if (handler != null)
            {
                handler(t);
            }
            if (progressChanged != null)
            {
                progressChanged(this, t);
            }
        }
    }
}
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Download the .NET Framework version 4.5 and install it on your PC. Then get a copy of something like dotPeek and use that to look at the source code for Progress.

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=8483

http://www.jetbrains.com/decompiler/

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I know, but I can't install it (I've edited my question) –  bbaia May 25 '12 at 8:01
1  
Ahhh OK. Only option is use another PC where you can install it. Although the .NET source code is available, you cannot simply browse it like a public repository. You need to use something like .NET Reflector, or dotPeek, or even Visual Studio itself when configured to do so, to download the symbols for the .NET framework. That will allow you to view the source code. –  Jason Evans May 25 '12 at 8:07
    
I was expecting someone with .NET 4.5 installed to do this for me as I don't have .NET 4.5. I can't install it because it overrides .NET 4 –  bbaia May 25 '12 at 8:11
    
You can target .NET 4.0 even with .NET 4.5 installed, @bbaia. –  Cody Gray May 25 '12 at 8:54
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