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I'm generating a Greeter.dll using the Roslyn compiler. My problem occurs trying to load the DLL file.

Here's the code:

using System;

using Roslyn.Compilers;
using Roslyn.Compilers.CSharp;

using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq;

namespace LoadingAClass
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var syntaxTree = SyntaxTree.ParseCompilationUnit(@"
class Greeter
{
    static void Greet()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(""Hello, World"");
    }
}");

            var compilation = Compilation.Create("Greeter.dll",
                syntaxTrees: new[] { syntaxTree },
                references: new[] {
                    new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(object).Assembly.Location),
                    new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(Enumerable).Assembly.Location),
                });

            Assembly assembly;
            using (var file = new FileStream("Greeter.dll", FileMode.Create))
            {
                EmitResult result = compilation.Emit(file);
            }

            assembly = Assembly.LoadFile(Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), @"Greeter.dll"));
            Type type = assembly.GetType("Greeter");
            var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);

            type.InvokeMember("Greet",
                BindingFlags.Default | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod,
                null,
                obj,
                null);

            Console.WriteLine("<ENTER> to continue");
            Console.ReadLine();

        }
    }
    // Thanks, http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2011/11/23/using-the-roslyn-symbol-api.aspx
}

The error message occurs on the line assembly = Assembly.LoadFile(Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), @"Greeter.dll")); and reads

Im Modul wurde ein Assemblymanifest erwartet. (Ausnahme von HRESULT: 0x80131018)

Which roughly translates to

An assembly manifest was expected in the module.

Does anyone know what I'm missing here?

share|improve this question
    
You have several mistakes in your code. Apparently, you already figured them out (but needing a PDB was not among them). Next time, look at result.Diagnostics to find out what the problem is. –  svick May 25 '12 at 11:45

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I have been adding Roslyn support to the O2 Plarform and here is how you can use its Roslyn support to compile (code), create (and assembly) and invoke (its method) one line of code:

return @"using System; class Greeter { static string Greet() {  return ""Another hello!!""; }}"
        .tree().compiler("Great").create_Assembly().type("Greeter").invokeStatic("Greet"); 

//O2Ref:O2_FluentSharp_Roslyn.dll

Here is a version that executes a code snippet that looks like yours (I added a return value):

panel.clear().add_ConsoleOut();
var code = @"
using System;
class Greeter
{
    static string Greet()
    { 
        Console.WriteLine(""Hello, World""); 
        return ""hello from here"";
    }
}";
var tree = code.astTree();
if (tree.hasErrors())
    return tree.errors();   

var compiler = tree.compiler("Great")
                   .add_Reference("mscorlib");

if (compiler.hasErrors()) 
    return compiler.errors();    

var assembly  =tree.compiler("Great")
                   .create_Assembly();

return assembly.type("Greeter")
               .invokeStatic("Greet"); 

//O2Ref:O2_FluentSharp_Roslyn.dll
//O2File:_Extra_methods_Roslyn_API.cs
//O2File:API_ConsoleOut.cs

For a couple more details and screenshots of what this looks like, see this blog post: 1 line to compile, create and execute: O2 Script to use Roslyn to Dynamically compile and execute a method

UPDATE: see http://blog.diniscruz.com/search/label/Roslyn for a large number number of Roslyn related posts and tools (created using the O2 Platform)

share|improve this answer

I stumbled across this and, even though you have an accepted answer, I don't think it's helpful in general. So, I'll just leave this here for future searchers like myself.

The problem with the code is two things, which you would have found out by looking at the returned value from

EmitResult result = compilation.Emit(file);

If you look at the properties on the EmitResult object, you would have found that there were 2 errors in the results.Diagnostics member.

  1. Main method not found
  2. Couldn't find class Console

So, to fix the problem, 1. You need to mark the output as a dll 2. You need to add 'using System;' to the code you're passing into the API or say 'System.Console.WriteLine'

The following code works making changes to fix those two issues:

        var outputFile = "Greeter.dll";
        var syntaxTree = SyntaxTree.ParseCompilationUnit(@"
 // ADDED THE FOLLOWING LINE
using System;

class Greeter
{
    public void Greet()
    {
        Console.WriteLine(""Hello, World"");
    }
}");
        var compilation = Compilation.Create(outputFile,
            syntaxTrees: new[] { syntaxTree },
            references: new[] {
                new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(object).Assembly.Location),
                new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(Enumerable).Assembly.Location),
            },

// ADDED THE FOLLOWING LINE
            options: new CompilationOptions(OutputKind.DynamicallyLinkedLibrary));

        using (var file = new FileStream(outputFile, FileMode.Create))
        {
            EmitResult result = compilation.Emit(file);
        }

        Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom("Greeter.dll");

        Type type = assembly.GetType("Greeter");
        var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);

        type.InvokeMember("Greet",
            BindingFlags.Default | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod,
            null,
            obj,
            null);

        Console.WriteLine("<ENTER> to continue");
        Console.ReadLine();
share|improve this answer

There is a new API for the References that looks like this:

var compilation = Compilation.Create(outputFile,
    syntaxTrees: new[] { syntaxTree },
    references: new[] {
        new MetadataFileReference(typeof(object).Assembly.Location),
        new MetadataFileReference(typeof(Enumerable).Assembly.Location),
    },
    options: new CompilationOptions(OutputKind.DynamicallyLinkedLibrary)
);

This is with the latest Roslyn-CTP 2012 in Sept...

share|improve this answer

Turns out I needed to create a pdb file.

using (FileStream dllStream = new FileStream(dllPath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
using (FileStream pdbStream = new FileStream(pdbPath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
{
    result = compilation.Emit(
       executableStream: dllStream,
       pdbFileName: pdbPath,
       pdbStream: pdbStream);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not what the problem in your code was. –  svick May 25 '12 at 11:43

This code worked beautifully:

using System;

using Roslyn.Compilers;
using Roslyn.Compilers.CSharp;

using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq;

namespace LoadingAClass
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var syntaxTree = SyntaxTree.ParseCompilationUnit(@"
using System;
namespace HelloWorld
{
    class Greeter
    {
        public static void Greet()
        {
            Console.WriteLine(""Hello, World"");
        }
    }
}");

            string dllPath = Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), "Greeter.dll");
            string pdbPath = Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), "Greeter.pdb");

            var compilation = Compilation.Create(dllPath,
                new CompilationOptions(
                    assemblyKind: AssemblyKind.DynamicallyLinkedLibrary
                ))
                .AddSyntaxTrees( syntaxTree )
                .AddReferences(new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(object).Assembly.Location))
                .AddReferences(new AssemblyFileReference(typeof(Enumerable).Assembly.Location));

            EmitResult result;

            using (FileStream dllStream = new FileStream(dllPath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
            using (FileStream pdbStream = new FileStream(pdbPath, FileMode.OpenOrCreate))
            {
                result = compilation.Emit(
                    executableStream: dllStream,
                    pdbFileName: pdbPath,
                    pdbStream: pdbStream);
            }

            if (result.Success)
            {
                //assembly = Assembly.LoadFile(Path.Combine(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory(), @"Greeter.dll"));
                Assembly assembly = Assembly.LoadFrom(@"Greeter.dll");

                Type type = assembly.GetType("HelloWorld.Greeter");
                var obj = Activator.CreateInstance(type);

                type.InvokeMember("Greet",
                    BindingFlags.Default | BindingFlags.InvokeMethod,
                    null,
                    obj,
                    null);
            }
            else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("No Go");
                Console.WriteLine(result.Diagnostics.ToString());
            }

            Console.WriteLine("<ENTER> to continue");
            Console.ReadLine();

        }
    }
    // Thanks, http://blogs.msdn.com/b/csharpfaq/archive/2011/11/23/using-the-roslyn-symbol-api.aspx
    // Thanks, http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/roslyn/thread/d620a4a1-3a90-401b-b946-bfa1fc6ad7a2
}
share|improve this answer
2  
Just a piece of code with no explanation is not very useful. Does this mean you solved your problem? Or is this supposed to be just an extension of the question? –  svick May 25 '12 at 11:32
    
Note that in the CompilationsOptions the AssemblyKind has been renamed to : OutputKind.DynamicallyLinkedLibrary –  Dinis Cruz Jun 11 '12 at 10:32
    
For reference one of the issues with the original code was the not definition of the OutputKind (since one of the errors was the need to have a static Main method) –  Dinis Cruz Jun 11 '12 at 10:33

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