Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I've encountered a class which extends Exception :

public class MyException extends Exception
{
    public MyException()
    {
        super();
    }

    public MyException(final String argMessage, final Throwable argCause)
    {
        super(argMessage, argCause);
    }

    public MyException(final String argMessage)
    {
        super(argMessage);
    }

    public MyException(final Throwable argCause)
    {
        super(argCause);
    }


}

Is it not pointless extening exception this way since all of the overriding constructors are just calling the super class Exception ?

share|improve this question
up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, it is not pointless. You can catch the specific exception this way and handle it specifically, rather then catching a general Exception, which might not be handled in all cases.

With this, you can do:

try { 
  foo();
} catch (MyException e) {
  handleMyException(e);
}

Which is not possible if you do not know how to handle a general Exception, but you can handle MyException better.

It is also improves readability - it is better to declare a method as throws MyException (with better name usually) then throws Exception - you know what can go wrong much better this way.

share|improve this answer

Yes, there's a reason. It allows you to differentiate the type of your exceptions.

Suppose this following code:

try {
    // some instructions
} catch (MyFirstException firstException) {
    // Handler for the first exception
} catch (MySecondException secondException) {
    // Handler for the first exception
} catch (Exception exception) {
    // Handler for all other exceptions
}

Event if the MyFirstException and MySecondException inherit from Exception and override all methods, you can distinguish them in the catch blocks. So, you can have different handlers for both exceptions.

share|improve this answer

when you would always do a catch (Exception e) you would actually catch each and every subclass of Exception, this specifically also applies to RuntimeExceptions which you usually don't want to catch. This can only be made worse by catching Throwable

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.