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Mocha tries to find test files under test by default, how to specify another dir, e.g. server-test?

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5 Answers

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here's one way, if you have subfolders in your test folder e.g.

/test
/test/server-test
/test/other-test

Then in linux you can use the find command to list all *.js files recursively and pass it to mocha:

mocha $(find test -name '*.js')
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Don't use the -g or --grep option, that pattern operates on the name of the test inside of it(), not the filesystem. The current documentation is misleading and/or outright wrong concerning this. To limit the entire command to a portion of the filesystem, you can pass a pattern as the last argument (its not a flag).

For example, this command will set your reporter to spec but will only test js files immediately inside of the server-test directory:

mocha --reporter spec server-test/*.js

This command will do the same as above, plus it will only run the test cases where the it() string/definition of a test begins with "Fnord:":

mocha --reporter spec --grep "Fnord:" server-test/*.js
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Use this:

mocha server-test

Or if you have subdirectories use this:

mocha "server-test/**/*.js"

Note the use of double quotes. If you omit them you may not be able to run tests in subdirectories.

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This doesn't seem to be any "easy" support for changing test directory.
However, maybe you should take a look at this issue, relative to your question.

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I am on Windows 7 using node.js v0.10.0 and mocha v1.8.2 and npm v1.2.14. I was just trying to get mocha to use the path test/unit to find my tests, After spending to long and trying several things I landed,

Using the "test/unit/*.js" option does not work on windows. For good reasons that windows shell doesn't expand wildcards like unixen.

However using "test/unit" does work, without the file pattern. eg. "mocha test/unit" runs all files found in test/unit folder.

This only still runs one folder files as tests but you can pass multiple directory names as parameters.

Also to run a single test file you can specify the full path and filename. eg. "mocha test/unit/mytest1.js"

I actually setup in package.json for npm "scripts": { "test": "mocha test/unit" },

So that 'npm test' runs my unit tests.

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