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I'm editing an ActionScript file and I've run into an issue.

When I put the following, everything is fine.

if (x=x) {
//blah
}

If I put this, it says unexpected ; for one line and } for the another:

for (x=x) {
//blah
}

Same with when I put this:

while (x=x) {
//blah
}

Of course I only put those there as examples to test it, because I thought something was wrong with my code. Is ActionScript, in this part of my file, only allowing IF statements or what? I need to do the same long series of steps to two different strings, but I don't want to put the code in there twice. Do I have to make a function?

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4 Answers 4

Read up on the looping syntax here.

The For loop doesn't take a boolean (true/false), it needs a counter, a boolean check for the limit and an increment.

i.e.

for (counter; condition; action){
    statements;
}
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I've never used action script but I would suggest trying this with

x==x

Since once = is assignment, not a comparison.

if the for loop still does not function try

for(;x==x;){
}

the semicolons tell it that you want to only use the second statement in the for loop declaration, the condition; since for loops use three statements,

for (variable; condition; iterative action)

by placing semicolons before and after x==x you specify only the condition, which seems to be what you're trying to do.

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Turns out using any IF or WHILE statements caused the error no matter what was inside.

I was able to accomplish what I wanted by making another function and sending each string though those.

Appreciate the help, voted up on both of y'all.

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Can you post the code, I'd be curious to see what was going wrong. If not that's fine too. Best of luck! –  Hawken May 26 '12 at 14:57

you have to write it like this:

if(a==x){
// do that
}


for (x=0; x<maxloops; x++){
// do that
}

while(a==x){
}

The = symbol is used to define values to varialbes, while == has to be used when you comparing / checking (i.e. whether this is equal to that). This both applies to IF and WHILE

the FOR LOOP. Let's say that you want to execute the action "do that" 10 times. then you write

for (x=0; x<10; x++){
    // do that
}

the first part x=0 is the definition of the counting variable and its initial value the second part is the condition (run the loop as long as x is less than 10) the third part is the stepper. (how the counter will raise its value in each loop). x++ is a short way to write x = x +1;

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