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I have a little problem for you guys.

I would like to do this:

Type[] classes = new Type[]{ Class1, Class2 };

foreach(Type t in classes){   
  List<t> list = new List<t>(); 
}

Is there some way to do this?

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You have to use typeof(Class1). But the thing with the generics isn't possible, as far as I know. –  phg May 25 '12 at 12:10
    
wonder whats the use of the foreach ? –  V4Vendetta May 25 '12 at 12:11
    
I dont want to do typeof(class1) i want it completely dynamic. –  Stian Standahl May 25 '12 at 12:11
    
There isn't a way to get the specific sample to work, as casting to generics requires the type to be known at compile time. If that isn't what you are trying to do then I'd likely move to close as not a real question. –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:11
4  
Seems to be XY problem –  L.B May 25 '12 at 12:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You cannot cast to a generic type at runtime, because the type in the generic needs to be resolved at compile time.

You can create a generic type in a dynamic manner using reflection, but unless you hard-code the cast, all you get in return is an object.

I cannot really tell what it is you want, I have to agree with a comment this is an XY problem. I would be inclined to make the presumptuous statement that there is a design issue somewhere that this is trying to solve, instead of addressing the design issue directly, or asking the question of what you are trying to achieve directly.


You can use the following code to create the type, then the dynamic type can be used to duck type the various members of List<T> without knowing/caring that it is a list or what T is:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace ConsoleApplication61
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            dynamic o = CreateGeneric(typeof(List<>), typeof(int));
            o.Add(1);
            Console.WriteLine(o[0]);
            Console.Read();
        }

        public static object CreateGeneric(Type generic, Type innerType, params object[] args)
        {
            System.Type specificType = generic.MakeGenericType(new System.Type[] { innerType });
            return Activator.CreateInstance(specificType, args);
        }
    }
}

The above sample duck types the Add method and the Indexer. The DLR does the type handling and the duck typing at runtime - knowing that 1 is an int, for example.

Just to clarify, I likely wouldn't use such code in production (unless you requirements are very specific to need this) and any issues with type-mismatching will occur at run time; so you either need to type very accurately (limited IntelliSense) or have good error handling.

Thanks to this blog post for the CreateGeneric method.

This assumes .NET 4 with the new CLR. As @MartinLiversage has also pointed out, this particular sample assumes that you are utilising the list in a sort-of-strongly-typed manner. In my example I am passing an int to a List<int> hidden in a dynamic.


We have been on .NET 4 almost since it was released. We have a large application with an even larger code base. dynamic isn't used once in the application, and only a few times in the test code base. That isn't to say "don't use it", it's to say "most of the time, you don't need it".

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1  
Nice use of dynamic but the call to o.Add(1) presumes that o is a List<int> and then you might as well cast to List<int> instead of using dynamic. Well, actually o.Add(1) works if the dynamic type is List<long>, List<short> etc. making it slightly more flexible than a cast to a specific list making it somewhat useful for a very special purpose scenario where you have lists of numbers of varying width. –  Martin Liversage May 25 '12 at 12:39
    
@MartinLiversage True, but that is just my example. I'm not sure what would happen if 1 was an object supplied as a parameter elsewhere - whether the DLR would identify the underlying type, or whether it wouldn't care and would try anyway. The scenario is quite specific IMO, if they are dynamically creating specific lists, I can only assume their use would also be specific. –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:41

You can do it like this:

foreach(Type t in classes)
{
   var listType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(t);
   var instance = Activator.CreateInstance(listType);
}
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3  
Activator.CreateInstance will return an object, how do you cast it at runtime to get strongly-typed access to t? –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:14
    
@AdamHouldsworth: The types are only known at run-time making it impossible to get strongly-typed access. –  Martin Liversage May 25 '12 at 12:23
1  
@MartinLiversage I know, sorry, the question was more rhetorical highlighting a missing piece - the OP sort of implies wanting to use the type in a strongly-typed manner, but dynamically... if that makes any sense lol –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:24
    
@AdamHouldsworth: Or perhaps he just want to know how to use reflection to create an instance of a generic type given the type parameters. My guess is as good as yours. –  Martin Liversage May 25 '12 at 12:26
    
@MartinLiversage Indeed, I don't disagree. I inferred as much in a comment on the question itself - having to guess means it is eligible for closure. –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:27

This is possible with the Type.MakeGenericType Method

Here's a nifty method I found that should work for ya: CodeRef

public static object CreateGeneric(Type generic, Type innerType, params object[] args)
{
    System.Type specificType = generic.MakeGenericType(new System.Type[] { innerType });
    return Activator.CreateInstance(specificType, args);
}

And use it like so:

var o = CreateGeneric(typeof(List<>), t);

Unfortunately, to add items you'll have to do it like so (where item is the item you're adding).

MethodInfo addMethod = o.GetType().GetMethod("Add");
addMethod.Invoke(o, new object[] { item.ToType(t) });

Or use the Generic type as mentioned in another answer.

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+1 didn't know this one –  Pencho Ilchev May 25 '12 at 12:14
1  
Copy paste from geekswithblogs.net/marcel/archive/2007/03/24/109722.aspx :). Can you show some code how to cast o to a proper List<T> ? I would be really interested in this.. –  Michal B. May 25 '12 at 12:18
1  
I believe this example doesn't feature the missing implied requirement of being able to use the list as normal without the ability to cast (unless you hard code the types, negating the point of the type list). –  Adam Houldsworth May 25 '12 at 12:26
    
@MichalB. - As far as I know, you won't be able to cast o to List<whatever>. You'll have to use reflection to get methods like 'Add' and use Invoke to invoke them. However, it might be possible derive from a non-generic base class and add whatever methods there. –  Chris Gessler May 25 '12 at 12:42

You can try this:

Type[] classes = new Type[] { typeof(A), typeof(B) };           
foreach (Type t in classes)
{
     Type genericType = typeof(List<>).MakeGenericType(t);
     var list = Activator.CreateInstance(genericType);
}
share|improve this answer
    
What was the point of trying to create the type dynamically with you ended up with an instance of a non-generic type? –  Pencho Ilchev May 25 '12 at 12:25
    
I realized it now. I will just update my answer –  gaurawerma May 25 '12 at 12:27
    
@PenchoIlchev - so that using methods like Add aren't such a pain in the ass. –  Chris Gessler May 25 '12 at 12:49
    
@ChrisGessler He was casting the returned object to IList. See the edits –  Pencho Ilchev May 25 '12 at 14:44

If you want to keep to objects in one list then probably they have something in common.

In such case, I would argue that, just like L.B mentioned in a comment, you are asking a wrong question here.

Probably it's a design issuethat you have. Think about those types, see what they have in common and think about deriving from one base type or make both implement the same interface. In such case you would be able to instantiate a list of the objects of the base type/interface and work with those.

Just to give you a head start:

    abstract class Vehicle {
        public int NumberOfWheels { get; set; }
    }

    class Car : Vehicle
    {
        public Car()
        {
            NumberOfWheels = 4;
        }
    }

    class Bicycle : Vehicle
    {
        public Bicycle()
        {
            NumberOfWheels = 2;
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        var v1 = new Car();
        var v2 = new Bicycle();

        var list = new List<Vehicle>();
        list.Add(v1);
        list.Add(v2);

        foreach (var v in list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(v.NumberOfWheels);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
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