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I've implemented a little helper class that provides an easy fail-safe implementation of the enum's valueOf method. This means in case the value is not found, it returns null instead of an exception.

Here's the code:

import com.google.common.collect.ImmutableMap;
import com.google.common.collect.Maps;

import java.io.Serializable;
import java.util.EnumSet;
import java.util.HashSet;
import java.util.Map;
import java.util.Set;

/**
 * <p>
 * This permits to easily implement a failsafe implementation of the enums's valueOf method
 * </p>
 *
 * <p>
 * Basic usage exemple on an enum class called MyEnum:
 * FailSafeValueOf.get(MyEnum.class).valueOf("EnumName");
 * </p>
 *
 * @author Sebastien Lorber <i>(lorber.sebastien@gmail.com)</i>
 */
public class FailSafeValueOf<T extends Enum<T>> implements Serializable {

    /**
     * This will cache a FailSafeValueOf for each enum so that we do not need to recompute a map each time
     */
    private static final Map< Class<? extends Enum<?>> , FailSafeValueOf<? extends Enum<?>> >  CACHE = Maps.newHashMap();


    private final Map<String,T> nameToEnumMap;
    private FailSafeValueOf(Class<T> enumClass) {
        Map<String,T> map = Maps.newHashMap();
        for ( T value : EnumSet.allOf(enumClass)) {
            map.put( value.name() , value);
        }
        this.nameToEnumMap = ImmutableMap.copyOf(map);
    }

    /**
     * Returns the value of the given enum element
     * If the element is not found, null will be returned, and no exception will be thrown
     * @param enumName
     * @return
     */
    public T valueOf(String enumName) {
        return nameToEnumMap.get(enumName);
    }


    /**
     * Get a failsafe value of implementation for a given enum
     * @param enumClass
     * @param <U>
     * @return
     */
    public static <U extends Enum<U>> FailSafeValueOf<U> get(Class<U> enumClass) {
        FailSafeValueOf<U> fsvo = (FailSafeValueOf<U>)CACHE.get(enumClass);
        if ( fsvo == null ) {
            synchronized (FailSafeValueOf.class) {
                fsvo = (FailSafeValueOf<U>)CACHE.get(enumClass);
                if ( fsvo == null ) {
                    fsvo = new FailSafeValueOf<U>(enumClass);
                    CACHE.put(enumClass,fsvo);
                }
            }
        }
        return fsvo;
    }

}

Because i don't want the (little) overhead of creating a new FailSafeValueOf at each access, i've made a cache that keeps for each enum already accessed an already built FailSafeValueOf instance.

I'm not used to handle concurrency. A concurrent access may not be a big problem in such a case as FailSafeValueOf is immutable and 2 different instances of FailSafeValueOf can be returned by the get method for a same enum. But i'd like to know if my implementation of thread-safety is the way to do, and if it's really thread-safe? (mostly for learning purpose)

I don't want to make my method synchronized because after some time, all FailSafeValueOf are created in the cache, and there is no need to forbid concurrent threads to enter the get method.

So what i've made is to check first if there's a cache miss, and then create a synchronized block that will atomically: check again the cache and eventually create the instance. Is it thread-safe and the way to do for such a need?

By the way, enums often have a small number of values. In such a case, is the HashMap an appropriate structure? Is it faster to iterate over the EnumSet and get the appropriate value, instead of using a cache?


Edit:

Please notice that my class is not so useful because the Guava team has releated a method Enums.getIfPresent() which returns an Optional

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1  
This would be more appropriate on codereview.stackexchange.com. –  Perception May 25 '12 at 12:46
3  
IIRC, it's probably better to just initialize the whole Map all at once -- almost all enums have only a few values, and just iterating through all of them once will be faster than dealing with synchronization at all. –  Louis Wasserman May 25 '12 at 13:14
    
Thanks. And do you know for which kind of enum size is it faster to iterate over the enumset instead of searching in the map? –  Sebastien Lorber May 25 '12 at 15:18
1  
I mean, iterating over them once to initialize the entire map was what I was suggesting, as opposed to filling out the map "lazily" (especially if you're trying to deal with synchronization concerns simultaneously). –  Louis Wasserman May 26 '12 at 6:50
    
Yes but how can i init that cache on startup? Are you saying i should use a ServiceLoader to create a FailSafeValueOf for each enum in my JVM? Because i just want to init a map for the enums i handle, not the enums in my libraries which will never use my class (i don't really like the idea to filter enums on the package) –  Sebastien Lorber May 26 '12 at 12:01
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your class is not thread-safe because you are not synchronizing around the CACHE.get() method. This assumes that Maps.newHashMap() returns a HashMap and not a ConcurrentHashMap class. You can see this in this code snippet:

    // you need to move your synchronized block out to here
    FailSafeValueOf<U> fsvo = (FailSafeValueOf<U>)CACHE.get(enumClass);
    if ( fsvo == null ) {
        synchronized (FailSafeValueOf.class) {
           ...
           CACHE.put(enumClass,fsvo);
        }
    }

You would need to move the synchronized around the CACHE.get(...) or switch to using a ConcurrentHashMap if that method is called frequently. The problem is that the HashMap would be updated by another thread while the current thread is reading from it -- this can easily cause problems because of race conditions.

Although slightly different, you should also look into the class "Double Check Locking" documentation to understand more the difficulties about trying to save yourself from synchronization like this.

Lastly, I would synchronize on the CACHE object instead of the class which is not recommended unless you really need to have that lock granularity.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, the Double Check Locking seems to be what i've tried... Btw if i have many ge() calls, having a synchronized over the cache get, or a ConcurrentHashMap won't lead to bad performance? –  Sebastien Lorber May 25 '12 at 13:27
    
It will be less performant but you have no choice dude. The alternative is invalid data or an exception. –  Gray May 25 '12 at 13:28
    
Btw @Sebastien, you understand that Double Check Locking doesn't work, right? Make sure you read the post for details. –  Gray May 25 '12 at 13:33
    
yes thanks, btw if i asked my questions it's because i supposed there were some stuff like that under the hood... :) –  Sebastien Lorber May 25 '12 at 14:59
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This is problematic:

synchronized (FailSafeValueOf.class)

You should only synchronize on private members. The class object is publicly accessible, and other code might choose to lock on it as well, leading to potential deadlock.

Also, the correct solution to allow concurrent get is a reader-writer lock, not skipping the lock. If your current code reads while writing you could get all kinds of grief.

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thanks, can you explain which classes to use please? –  Sebastien Lorber May 25 '12 at 13:23
    
Is there really much point in doing a ReadWriteLock @Ben since it also synchronizes and very little time is going to be spent inside of the lock? Isn't that just wasted complexity? –  Gray May 25 '12 at 13:43
    
@Gray: Evidently new FailSafeValueOf<U>(enumClass) is quite expensive, hence the reason for having a cache in the first place. –  Ben Voigt May 25 '12 at 13:45
    
And what will be the performances of a ReadWriteLock compared to the solution of @Gray having all synchronized? I guess it will be better because you can still read from many threads while you are not writing right? –  Sebastien Lorber May 25 '12 at 14:58
    
No, because a ReadWriteLock has to synchronize anyway. The question is how often you put() to the cache versus read. A ReadWriteLock is more expensive on the read portion so if you do put() fairly rarely, I wouldn't pay for the overhead myself. –  Gray May 25 '12 at 15:01
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I'd use

private static final Cache<Class<?>, FailSafeValueOf<?>> CACHE
    = CacheBuilder.newBuilder().build(
        new CacheLoader<Class<?>, FailSafeValueOf<?>>() {
            @Override
            public FailSafeValueOf<?> load(Class<?> key) throws Exception {
                return new FailSafeValueOf(key);
            }
    });

which gives you the most flexibility for the least work. Moreover, you can be pretty sure that it works correctly and fast.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks i didn't know this guava class. Btw under the hood it seems to provide a ConcurrentHashMap –  Sebastien Lorber May 26 '12 at 10:42
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