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Column A "Sales Dates", Column B "=A2-A1" for "Date Diff", Column C "Customer Name", Column D "Item", Column E "Items Ordered Count"

My issue is I have to do a running 30 day total for each customer to see that specific items are not being ordered above "x" number within any 30-day period.

Does anyone have any ideas?

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I guess I could do it the pain way by having a column with everyday of the year then just sum the last 30 days. –  Mark Jul 2 '09 at 17:37

2 Answers 2

I may not be fully understanding your question, but I don't think you can do what you ask in excel. This might be a situation where a database that can do SQL might come in handy.

The best I can come up with in excel is a Pivot Table, with the customers as rows, dates as columns (group by month), and sum of Items Ordered in the data area. Then conditional format the data area to highlight values > your limit.

Perhaps if you provide some sample data & output I can come up with something more like what you need.

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The formula would look something like this:

{=SUM(IF((A$2:A2>=A2-29)*(D$2:D2=D2),E$2:E2,0))}

It should be entered into cell F2 and copied down to the last row of your data. I pasted in a test spreadsheet below so you can see where things go (sorry for the formatting--hopefully it will look better if you paste it into Excel).

IMPORTANT: This is an array formula, so after you type in the formula (and don't type in the braces {} when you do), you must press Ctrl-Shift-Enter instead of just Enter (see this link for more details).

What does the formula do? It does two loops:

  • First, it loops through all the Sales Dates from the beginning of the log to the current row and checks if each date is between the date of the current row and 29 days earlier (which makes a 30-day window). (By "current row" I mean the row where the formula is located.)
  • Second, it loops through all the Items from the beginning of the log to the current row and checks if there is a match with the Item of the current row.

For any row where both checks are true (the "*" in the formula does an "and" operation), Items Ordered Count is added to the sum, otherwise zero is added to the sum. So, when it's finished, you have a count for each row of how many orders there were in the past 30 days for that item.

HTH,

-Dan

Sales Dates Date Diff	Customer Name	Item	Items Ordered Count	30-Day Count
1/1/2009    0	dfsadf	11336	70	70
1/2/2009    1	asdfd	10218	121	121
1/3/2009    1	fsdfjkfl	10942	101	101
1/6/2009    3	slkdjflsk	13710	80	80
1/7/2009    1	slkdjls	10480	127	127
1/9/2009    2	sdjjf	11336	143	213
1/11/2009   2	woieuriwe	11501	84	84
1/14/2009   3	owqieyurtn	10191	78	78
1/15/2009   1	weisd	10480	113	240
1/16/2009   1	woieuriwe	12024	133	133
1/17/2009   1	vkcjl	13818	125	125
1/20/2009   3	sdflkj	11336	128	341
1/23/2009   3	jnbkdl	10480	141	381
1/25/2009   2	pqcvnlz	10480	137	518
1/27/2009   2	hwodkjgfh	12878	80	80
1/28/2009   1	zjdnfg;pwlkd	10942	123	224
1/31/2009   3	zlkdjnf;psod	13173	93	93
2/2/2009    2	zlknpdodfg	11336	119	390
2/4/2009    2	zjhdfpwskjh	12004	57	57
2/5/2009    1	asdfd	10218	121	121
2/8/2009    3	fsdfjkfl	10942	101	224
2/11/2009   3	slkdjflsk	13710	80	80
2/14/2009   3	slkdjls	10480	127	405
2/16/2009   2	sdjjf	11336	143	390
2/18/2009   2	woieuriwe	11501	84	84
2/21/2009   3	owqieyurtn	10191	78	78
2/24/2009   3	weisd	10480	113	240
2/25/2009   1	woieuriwe	12024	133	133
2/27/2009   2	vkcjl	13818	125	125
2/28/2009   1	sdflkj	11336	128	390
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