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I have two tables in a MySQL database: "messages" and "message_tags". The "messages" table has an auto increment column "message_id". In Java I want to add a batch of messages to the database using the java.sql package. I want to do this in one transaction to save queries.

My SQL code should look something like this:

START TRANSACTION
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message1');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo1');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagbar1');
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message2');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo1');
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message3');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo2');
...
COMMIT

Is it possible to get all newly generated ids from the messages table back to java in a way, that they can be matched to the original messages? Something like this:

message1 => 1234
message2 => 1235
message3 => 1236
...
share|improve this question
    
Transactions don't save queries. The only thing a transaction does is allow you to roll back if one fails. You still have to execute each query. jcho360's answer is right, but it doesn't save queries. You could also run the last_insert_id query from Java to avoid using user variables. You could combine all the values into one large INSERT, but then you couldn't get the last_insert_id after each one. – Marcus Adams May 25 '12 at 13:55
    
Thank you for your comment, my wording was wrong. The Database is remote and I want to save connections by sending the messages as a batch in a transaction. – Thomas May 25 '12 at 13:58
    
Oh, you still don't need the transaction to batch these, unless you do need transactions. – Marcus Adams May 25 '12 at 14:00
up vote 2 down vote accepted

you didn't specify if it's static or dynamic, but I guess you can use something like this:

START TRANSACTION
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message1');
@message1:=last_insert_id();
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo1');
@message2:=last_insert_id();
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagbar1');
@message3:=last_insert_id();
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message2');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo1');
@message4:=last_insert_id();
INSERT INTO messages(`message`) VALUES ('message3');
INSERT INTO messages_tags(`message_id`, `tags`) VALUES (LAST_INSERT_ID(), 'tagfoo2');
@message5:=last_insert_id();
...
COMMIT

if you make

select @message1;

the result would be 1234, so you have

@message1 => 1234
@message2 => 1235
@message3 => 1236
...

but you have to specify the SQL variable manually at least you create a procedure, or a function.

share|improve this answer
    
I was thinking along these lines, then I realised it was slightly more complex. Returning the content of temporary table last_insert_id had been inserted, and then implicitly relying on something like Messages[0] (Message1) = MessageIds[0] would do it. Making me nervous though, think I'd be tempted to do them 1 at a time, instead of a batch. – Tony Hopkinson May 25 '12 at 13:53
    
Thank you for the suggestion, I will try to implement this and will give feedback after. – Thomas May 25 '12 at 13:59
    
it's ok, just let us know if you solve it please. – jcho360 May 25 '12 at 14:00
    
Seems to work, thank you very much! – Thomas May 29 '12 at 13:03

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