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I would think the following piece of code should work, but it doesn't:

if (!empty($r->getError()))

Where getError() is simply

public function getError()
{
    return $this->error;
}

Yet I end up with this error:

can't use method return value in write context

What does this means? Isn't this just a read?

Thanks in advance!

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Probably in PHP 5.5 you will be permitted to pass expressions to empty: wiki.php.net/rfc/empty_isset_exprs –  Carlos Campderrós Jul 31 '12 at 7:44
2  

6 Answers 6

up vote 212 down vote accepted

Note: This is a very high voted answer with a high visibility, but please note that it promotes bad, unnecessary coding practices! See @porneL's answer for the correct way.

Note #2: I endorse the suggestions to use @porneL's answer. When I wrote this answer three years ago, I merely meant to explain the nature of the error, not necessarily endorse the alternative. The code snippet below is not recommended.


It's a limitation of empty() in PHP versions below 5.5.

Note: empty() only checks variables as anything else will result in a parse error. In other words, the following will not work: empty(trim($name)).

You'd have to change to this

// Not recommended, just illustrates the issue
$err = $r->getError();
if (!empty($err))
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116  
This is insanely counterproductive. –  David Murdoch Dec 23 '10 at 20:26
20  
@David Murdoch php is full of little gems like this... –  cbednarski Jan 7 '11 at 23:40
37  
Note: The same is true with isset(). ie: isset($this->foo->getBar()) will result in the same issue. –  catchdave Jun 24 '11 at 23:45
6  
porneL's answer explains this in more detail, with a better solution –  SystemParadox Sep 9 '11 at 14:21
3  
@SystemParadox - Depends on what you mean by "better". porneL's answer is arguably more thorough with a "cleaner" solution, but also doesn't actually explain the origin of the error either. –  Peter Bailey Sep 12 '11 at 22:22

empty() needs to access value by reference (in order to check whether that reference points to something that exists), and PHP before 5.5 didn't support references to temporary values returned from functions.

However, the real problem you have is that you use empty() at all, mistakenly believing that "empty" value is any different from "false".

Empty is just an alias for !isset($thing) || !$thing. When the thing you're checking always exists, the empty() function is nothing but a negation operator.

PHP doesn't have concept of emptyness. Values that evaluate to false are empty, values that evaluate to true are non-empty. It's the same thing. This code:

$x = something();
if (empty($x)) …

and this:

$x = something();
if (!$x) …

has always the same result, in all cases, for all datatypes (because $x is defined empty() is redundant).

Return value from the method always exists (even if you don't have return statement, return value exists and contains null). Therefore:

if (!empty($r->getError()))

is logically equivalent to:

if ($r->getError())
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19  
This is a much better answer than the one currently selected. –  SystemParadox Sep 9 '11 at 14:20
17  
@gcb: no, the PHP manual explicitly says it's identical: "empty() is the opposite of (boolean) var, except that no warning is generated when the variable is not set." –  porneL Oct 4 '11 at 23:33
12  
The not generating a warning part is pretty important... empty($var) will return true if it's 0, '', array(), NULL, or not even defined. It's good practice, particularly so you can log your real warnings without the files filling up –  landons Nov 15 '11 at 14:15
3  
Ok, great answer, but what's the right way to avoid this, does anyone know? –  Javatar Jan 20 '13 at 22:34
2  
@EugenMihailescu in general that's ok, but it's not strictly equivalent to empty(), because "", 0, etc. are "empty", but not null. –  porneL Apr 11 at 11:19

According to the PHP docs:

empty() only checks variables as anything else will result in a parse error

You cannot use empty() directly on a function's return value. Instead, set the return from getError() to a variable and run empty() on the variable.

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I usually create a global function called is_empty() just to get around this issue

function is_empty($var)
{ 
 return empty($var);
}

Then anywhere I would normally have used empty() I just use is_empty()

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18  
This is complete crap. Yes, it gets around the problem. But what a hack, when the language should just handle this. –  mediaslave May 24 '11 at 20:32
2  
It's better not to do this and stick to the standards (as annoying as they might be). –  tonyhb Aug 16 '11 at 9:52
1  
@dynamism could you explain why not? –  Janis Veinbergs Sep 19 '11 at 14:57
1  
Because convenience functions can be a pain to read in someone else's code. Plus, in a MVC/HMVC architecture it can mess your structure. At the end of the day, PHP coders should know it's limitations and be able to understand small workarounds without convenience functions. –  tonyhb Sep 26 '11 at 20:24
9  
Wow, you've just invented a negation function. You know PHP has ! operator for this? :) –  porneL Oct 4 '11 at 23:34

As pointed out by others, it's a (weird) limitation of empty().

For most purproses, doing this is equal as calling empty, but this works:

if ($r->getError() != '')
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The issue is this, you want to know if the error is not empty.

public function getError() {
    return $this->error;
}

Adding a method isErrorSet() will solve the problem.

public function isErrorSet() {
    if (isset($this->error) && !empty($this->error)) {
        return true;
    } else {
        return false;
    }
}

Now this will work fine with this code with no notice.

if (!($x->isErrorSet())) {
    echo $x->getError();
}
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protected by NullPoiиteя Sep 17 '13 at 6:24

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