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I'm trying to implement a simple layout, closely represented like this:

 _________________________
|     |   header    |     |
|  L  |_____________|  R  |
|     |             |     |
|     |             |     |
|     |             |     |
|     |    main     |     |
|     |             |     |
|     |             |     |
|     |             |     |
|_____|_____________|_____|

I've developed this code to accomplish my objective:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>Layout</title>
<style>

    * {
        margin: 0px;
        padding: 0px;
    }
    p {
        text-align: center;
    }
    div#left {
        float: left;    
        background-color: #777;
        width: 200px;
        height: 650px;
    }
    div#header {
        float: left;    
        background-color: #eee;
        width: 940px;
        height: 60px;
    }
    div#main {
        float: left;    
        width: 940px;
    }
    div#right {
        float: right;   
        background-color: #777;
        width: 200px;
        height: 650px;
    }
</style>
</head>

<body>
    <div id="left">
        <p>Left</p>
    </div>

    <div id="header">
        <p>Header</p>
    </div>

    <div id="main">
        <p>Main</p>     
    </div>

    <div id="right">
        <p>Right</p>
    </div>
</body>

But I can't get the 'right' column to stay aligned with the top. Can someone point me what to change in my CSS to correct this? Thanks!

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3 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Move the right column to the top of your HTML:

<body>

    <div id="right">
        <p>Right</p>
    </div>

    <div id="left">
        <p>Left</p>
    </div>

    <div id="header">
        <p>Header</p>
    </div>

    <div id="main">
        <p>Main</p>     
    </div>
</body>
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All fine now! Thanks! –  tessio fechine May 25 '12 at 16:42
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John Conde answer is correct. But to help you visualize the change change your widths to percentage and you'll see what he means. :)

    <!DOCTYPE html>
    <html>
    <head>
       <title>Layout</title>
    <style>

      * {
       margin: 0;
       padding: 0;
      }
      p {
       text-align: center;
      }
      div#left {
       background-color: #777777;
       float: left;
       height: 650px;
       width: 15%;
      }
      div#header {
        background-color: #EEEEEE;
        float: left;
       height: 60px;
       width: 70%;
      }
      div#main {
       float: left;
       width: 70%;
      }
    div#right {
      background-color: #777777;
      float: right;
      height: 650px;
      width: 15%;
    }
    </style>
    </head>

    <body>
    <div id="left">
        <p>Left</p>
    </div>
    <div id="right">
        <p>Right</p>
    </div>
    <div id="header">
        <p>Header</p>
    </div>

    <div id="main">
        <p>Main</p>     
    </div>
    </body>
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To achieve correct, cross-browser compatible, float layouts, it is important you correctly order elements. To achieve this you should always have floated elements appear BEFORE non-floated elements.

You must also prioritize vertical layout too, for example if the header in your example was going to spread across the full width of the page, this would come before any floated elements which follow it.

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