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Currently, I added schema.org Microdata to my page. I didn't add hidden content using <meta>, I just used it on the page content where I could find suitable schema.org vocabulary. But now the size of the gzipped version of my file increased by 11%, the size of the normal version increased by 24%.

That's clearly too much for markup which is currently just used by some search bots. That's why I thought about c14n. I know that it's maybe not the best way, but I want to create a version with Microdata and a version without Microdata and then I link them together using HTTP's Link: <http://www.example.com/>; rel="canonical".

My Question:

  1. What do you thing about solving the problem using c14n.
  2. Is there a better way to add advanced metadata without increasing the size that much?
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4  
I don't think this is a problem at all, only a good excercise. On an average site and on an average connection, the size of the pure html file is only a small factor in loading time - It's additional connects to fetch js/css/images that take time. Plus, consider the absolute size of your files. Usually, just one more medium sized image will cost you a lot more KB than a full microdata-isation of your HTML –  cypherabe May 25 '12 at 15:29
    
@cypherabe Modern browsers can download my image in parallel using SPDY. And even if my image needs some more time, I just need to specify width and height and so it's not touching the layout of the other elements. But if I use Microdata consequently, it will add some machine-readable metadata overhead stuff above and between the important main content. It would be okay for me to be able to send the Microdata separately after sending the main content. But Microdata is very convoluted with the tree structure, so I have to embed it directly in the page's content. –  fridojet May 25 '12 at 22:29
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1 Answer

  1. I don't think canonicalization would work. Using <link rel="canonical href="microdatversion"> would essentially tell the bots to index the microdata version and all its microdata(good). but it would also rank this version for query results which would take the user to the microdata version(bad).
  2. I would write a script to add all the microdata after. obviously defer the script load. You could add the attributes as class names like so.

    <div class="it-p is ip-d"></div>

    <script defer>

function shortHand(type, cName)
{
    if(type ==='itemprop')
    {
        switch(cName)
        {
         case 'n': return 'name';
         break;
         case 'd': return 'description'
         break;
         default:  return cName;
         }
    }
    if(type==='itemtype')
    {
        switch(cName)
        {
        case 'p': return 'Product';
        break;
        default : return cName;
        }
    }

}
function addItemprop(el,cName)
{
    cName = shortHand('itemprop', cName);
    el.setAttribute('itemprop',cName)
}
function addItemtype(el,cName)
{
    cName = shortHand('itemtype', cName);
    el.setAttribute('itemtype','http://scheme.org/'+cName)
}

$('[class]').filter(function()
{
    var removeclass=[];

    for(var i=0; i < this.classList.length; i++) 
    {
        var cName =this.classList[i];
        if (/^ip-/.test(cName))addItemprop(this,cName.replace('ip-',''));removeclass.push(cName);
        if (cName =='is')removeclass.push(cName);this.setAttribute('itemscope','');
        if (/^it-/.test(cName))addItemtype(this,cName.replace('it-',''));removeclass.push(cName);

    }
    for(var i=0; i < removeclass.length; i++) 
    {
        this.classList.remove(removeclass[i]);
    }
});
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