Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been trying to extract something inside a string. I got the follwing string :

*, bob, DATE('gdfgfd', 'Fdsfds', ('fdsfdfsd')), george

I want to extract by commas outside () and it is suppose to give this :

  • *
  • bob
  • DATE('gdfgfd', 'Fdsfds', ('fdsfdfsd'))
  • george

I've been trying to use explode but it cut even inside ( and ) ... logic by the function mean.

So I've did this : [^(,\s]+|\([^)]+\) but it give cut even if a commas is found inside bracket.

Anyone know how to do what i mean ?

Thanks

EDIT :

Ok to be very clear and direct.

I got this : SELECT MyField, Field2, Blabla, Function(param), etc FROM table Blabla

I got the string MyField, Field2, Blabla, Function(param), etc already because the query is done by multiple function class like $DB->Select('MyField, Field2, Blabla, Function(param), etc'); but now I want to parse everything between commas so MyField, Field2, Blabla, Function(param), etc become this :

  • MyField
  • Field2
  • Blabla
  • Function(param)
  • etc
share|improve this question
3  
SQL is an irregular language; matching/analyzing it with a regular expression is the incorrect way to go about this. It's the wrong tool for the job. (That's not to say that it won't work, it'll probably end up biting you in the rear later on, though.) –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 15:20
    
@SpikeX How you suggest to split a statement then ? SELECT (this) FROM –  David Bélanger May 25 '12 at 15:21
    
Some form of string parsing logic written in PHP, since with PHP you have much greater control and a much wider selection of parsing tools available at your disposal (things like conditionals, loops, etc). –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 15:22
1  
@DavidBélanger This will not answer your question, but it is relevant to your interest and I completly agree with the accepted answer. –  PenguinCoder May 25 '12 at 15:28
1  
@DavidBélanger That Regex is going to come back to haunt you, I promise. You're trying to fasten a screw with a hammer. –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 15:42
show 7 more comments

6 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's what I cooked up, doesn't support multibyte characters:

Edit: added string awareness

<?php


$stack = array();
$stuff = array();

$escaping = false;
$input = "*, bob, [], DATE('g()d\\'f,gfd', ('Fd()sf)ds'), ('fdsfd\"\"()fsd')), ',(),() (,,'";
$len = strlen( $input );
$i = 0;
$curstr = "";
$char;

while( $i < $len ) {
    $char = $input[$i++];

    if( $escaping ) {
        $curstr .= $char;
        $escaping = false;
        continue;
    }

    switch( $char ) {

        case "\\":
            $escaping = true;
            break;

        case '"':
            $top = end( $stack );
            if( $top === '"' ) {
                array_pop( $stack );
            }
            else if( $top !== "'" ){
                $stack[] = '"';
            }

            $curstr .= $char;
            break;

        case "'":
            $top = end( $stack );
            if( $top === "'" ) {
                array_pop( $stack );
            }
            else if( $top !== '"' ) {
                $stack[] = "'";
            }

            $curstr .= $char;           
            break;

        case ",":
            if( count( $stack ) ) {
                $curstr .= $char;
            }
            else {
                $stuff[] = trim($curstr);
                $curstr = "";
            }
            break;

        case "(":
            $top = end( $stack );
            if( $top !== "'" && $top !== '"' ) {
                $stack[] = "(";                   
            }

            $curstr .= $char;
            break;

        case ")":
            $top = end( $stack );

            if( $top !== "'" && $top !== '"' ) {
                if( end($stack) !== "(" ) {
                    die( "Unbalanced parentheses" );
                }
                array_pop( $stack );
            }

            $curstr .= $char;


            break;

        default:
            $curstr .= $char;
            break;

    }
}

if( count( $stack ) ) {
    die( "Unbalanced ".end($stack) );
}

$stuff[] = trim( $curstr );

print_r( $stuff );

/*
    Array
(
    [0] => *
    [1] => bob
    [2] => []
    [3] => DATE('g()d'f,gfd', ('Fd()sf)ds'), ('fdsfd""()fsd'))
    [4] => ',(),() (,,'
)

*/
share|improve this answer
    
As with my solution it won't work if there are brackets within quoted data. –  diolemo May 25 '12 at 15:57
    
@diolemo what do you mean? brackets are treated as any normal character here (not comma, ( or ) ). Didn't see op wanted them to be treated specially? –  Esailija May 25 '12 at 15:59
    
This is what I was not looking for, since I wanted regex. BUT, this is better and THIS is working well. Thanks a lot sir. –  David Bélanger May 25 '12 at 16:00
    
Consider this example. 'test(1', 'test2' We have to allow for brackets within quoted strings (those should not be considered). Take a look at my solution too as it is shorter (but it suffers the same problem). –  diolemo May 25 '12 at 16:03
1  
@DavidBélanger it depends whether any part of your query is constructed from user provided data. If not then you are fine to use this or my solution. –  diolemo May 25 '12 at 16:08
show 14 more comments

Posting this as an answer since it's probably better than anything else:

http://code.google.com/p/php-sql-parser/

Use that project to parse your SQL statements. The results come back as an array, including the bits in between SELECT and FROM as individual elements, just as you want. This will work far better than any regular expression solution you use.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree this is the way to go when parsing an SQL statement. But this is not I was looking for my need. –  David Bélanger May 25 '12 at 15:59
    
Why not? You need to parse a SQL string and retrieve the elements of the SELECT portion of the string. Why does this not do what you want? –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 16:00
    
Because this is not what it intend to do. Why use a Civic instead of a Ferrari ? A huge class will take way more horse power then a simple function / regex. I don't need to parse complicated string, only simple as you saw. –  David Bélanger May 25 '12 at 16:04
    
I think you're overestimating the overhead associated with that project. If it's all class-based, only the classes you invoke take up memory, not the entire project. –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 16:06
add comment

You stated in your comments that you're prepared to use recursion because you have nested lists. However, regex cannot do recursion. This is because regex cannot "count" anything indefinitely. Since it has no way of counting open/close parenthesis, it can't know how many levels in it is, or how many levels out it must go.

You can write horrendously complex regex to handle N levels of depth (see anubhava's answer), but as soon as you run across an expression with N+1 levels of depth your regex will fail. This is why we use programming languages to parse irregular languages because they can count recursion (see diolemo's answer). Within this recursion, we can use small bits of regex.

share|improve this answer
    
Explain this then : stackoverflow.com/questions/10624370/… –  David Bélanger May 25 '12 at 15:32
2  
@DavidBélanger Notice how little regex there is in that solution. The regex isn't doing any more than character validation - it's not doing any of the parsing. You can use regex in recursion, but not recursion in regex. –  dlras2 May 25 '12 at 15:49
add comment

This will work (for the most part). It will fail if you have brackets within quotes (part of the data). You can extend the code to handle quoted brackets if you want (but then you have to consider escaped quotes and everything like that. A regular expression will never work well.

Edit: Better to use the PHP SQL Parser as answered by SpikeX.

function unreliable_comma_explode($str)
{
   $last_split = 0;
   $len = strlen($str);
   $brackets = 0;
   $parts = array();

   for ($i = 0; $i < $len; $i++)
   {
      if ($str[$i] == '(') 
      {
         $brackets++;
         continue;
      }

      if ($str[$i] == ')')
      {
         if (--$brackets == -1) $brackets = 0;
         continue;
      }

      if ($str[$i] == ',' && $brackets == 0)
      {
         $parts[] = substr($str, $last_split, ($i-$last_split));
         $last_split = $i + 1;
      }
   }

   if (($len-$last_split) > 0)
      $parts[] = substr($str, $last_split, ($len-$last_split));

   return $parts;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use this regex based code to get the split result the way you want:

$str = "*, bob, DATE('gdfgfd', 'Fdsfds', ('fdsfdfsd')), george";
$arr = preg_split('/([^,]*(?:\([^)]*\))[^,]*)+|,/', $str, -1,
                      PREG_SPLIT_DELIM_CAPTURE | PREG_SPLIT_NO_EMPTY);

Update:

Though my original answer worked for the example that OP posted but due the concerns raised by some members I am posting a solution that will work with nested parenthesis as well as long as brackets are balanced:

$str = "*, bob, DATE('gdfgfd', ('Fdsfds'), ('fdsfdfsd', ('foo'))) 'foo'=[bar]," .
       "john, MY('gdfgfd', ((('Fdsfds'))), ('fdsfdfsd')), george";
$arr = preg_split('/\s*( [^,()]* \( ( [^()]* | (?R) )* \) [^,()]* ) ,?\s* | \s*,\s*/x',
                  $str, -1 , PREG_SPLIT_DELIM_CAPTURE | PREG_SPLIT_NO_EMPTY);
print_r($arr);

OUTPUT:

Array
(
    [0] => *
    [1] => bob
    [2] => DATE('gdfgfd', ('Fdsfds'), ('fdsfdfsd', ('foo'))) 'foo'=[bar]
    [3] => john
    [4] => MY('gdfgfd', ((('Fdsfds'))), ('fdsfdfsd'))
    [5] => george
)

Caution: Even though this recursion based regex pattern works with deep nested brackets now it doesn't mean that this cannot be broken for some edge case situations (like unbalanced brackets).

share|improve this answer
    
Breaks with: "*, bob, DATE('gdfgfd', ('Fdsfds'), ('fdsfdfsd')), george" –  diolemo May 25 '12 at 15:51
    
Just be careful - this will break if you have any loops nested further than this. –  dlras2 May 25 '12 at 15:52
1  
I'm very curious how this actually works... I can't replicate your results. What does (?R) do? –  dlras2 May 26 '12 at 3:02
1  
@DanRasmussen: Here is the code Working Demo: ideone.com/4Eqhj and here is a great tutorial on Recursive Reex in PHP –  anubhava May 26 '12 at 4:21
1  
@anubhava +2 for teaching me something completely new about regex. -1 for shattering my perception of "regular" expressions... –  dlras2 May 29 '12 at 18:50
show 4 more comments

I'm not really sure about what you want to do here.. But if you just want to extract strings. You can just use implode.

$array = array("*", "bob", "DATE('gdfgfd', 'Fdsfds', '(\"fdsfdfsd\"))", "george");
echo $test = implode($array, ",");
share|improve this answer
    
He said implode didn't work because he wanted everything inside DATE(...) as a single entity. –  SpikeX May 25 '12 at 15:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.