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It is more of a theoretical question: Is it possible by any means in C# to create a truly immutable doubly linked list? A problem as I see it is in the mutual dependency of 2 adjacent nodes.

By "truly" I mean using readonly fields.

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I don't see why not if you are willing to make a full copy of the list on every mutating operation. You can have as many private constructors as you want to that take care of creating a new list based on the old one and the modification being done. –  Jon May 25 '12 at 15:43
2  
    
Jon, it's not a problem to copy a list that once been created, problem is in creating such list using the "readonly field" feature of C#. –  Aleksey Bykov May 25 '12 at 17:24
    
Out of curiosity, i have been looking over this to help with a similar issue I am looking at, and i we put aside inefficiencies and alternatives for the time, I am still curious to know if the constructor solution would work if inserting into a position not first or last in the list, as to insert into the middle of a linked list would require recursive action in both directions? Am i correct in thinking that the accepted answer only covers inserts in the last place? or have i misunderstood? –  Opentuned Jan 3 at 12:34
    
You cannot insert into an immutable list (immutable means it's unchangeable). You can rather create a copy of the original list with a slight change - a new node in the middle of it. With singly linked lists adding a node to the head of the list doesn't have any overhead since the new list is composed of the new element in the head that is linked to the whole old list (its head element). –  Aleksey Bykov Jan 3 at 15:45

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is possible to do with tricky constructor logic. For example

public sealed class Node<T> { 
  readonly T m_data;
  readonly Node<T> m_prev;
  readonly Node<T> m_next;

  // Data, Next, Prev accessors omitted for brevity      

  public Node(T data, Node<T> prev, IEnumerator<T> rest) { 
    m_data = data;
    m_prev = prev;
    if (rest.MoveNext()) {
      m_next = new Node(rest.Current, this, rest);
    }
  }
}

public static class Node {    
  public static Node<T> Create<T>(IEnumerable<T> enumerable) {
    using (var enumerator = enumerable.GetEnumerator()) {
      if (!enumerator.MoveNext()) {
        return null;
      }
      return new Node(enumerator.Current, null, enumerator);
    }
  }
}

Node<string> list = Node.Create(new [] { "a", "b", "c", "d" });
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nice, just thought about the same a second ago! :) –  Aleksey Bykov May 25 '12 at 15:46
    
Very similar to my answer as well; I'll keep mine cause all necessary logic is contained in one class, but +1. –  KeithS May 25 '12 at 17:01

You piqued my curiousity. The class for a ReadOnlyNode is simple enough to define:

public class ReadOnlyNode<T>
{
   public readonly T Value;
   public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Next;
   public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Prev;

   public Node(T value, ReadOnlyNode<T> next, ReadOnlyNode<T> prev)
   {
      Value = value;
      Next = next;
      Prev = prev;
   }
}

The problem with readonly in a doubly-linked list is that, for each node, you have to specify that node's previous and next nodes in the constructor, so if they're passed from outside the constructor they must already exist. But, Node M needs a pre-existing Node N as its "next" node when you call the constructor, but that node N needs M as its "previous" node in order to be constructed. This creates a "chicken and egg" situation where both N and M need the other node to be instantiated first.

However, there's more than one way to skin this cat. What if each node of a list was instantiated recursively from within the constructor of one ReadOnlyNode? Until each constructor was complete, the properties at each level would still be mutable, and the reference to each Node would exist in its constructor, so it wouldn't matter that not everything had been set up until everything is set up. The following code compiles, and given a pre-existing IEnumerable will produce an immutable doubly-linked list:

public class ReadOnlyNode<T>
{
    public readonly T Value;
    public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Next;
    public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Prev;

    private ReadOnlyNode(IEnumerable<T> elements, ReadOnlyNode<T> prev)
    {
        if(elements == null || !elements.Any()) 
           throw new ArgumentException(
              "Enumerable must not be null and must have at least one element");
        Next = elements.Count() == 1 
           ? null 
           : new ReadOnlyNode<T>(elements.Skip(1), this);
        Value = elements.First();
        Prev = prev;
    }

    public ReadOnlyNode(IEnumerable<T> elements)
        : this(elements, null)
    {
    }
}


//Usage - creates an immutable doubly-linked list of integers from 1 to 1000
var immutableList = new ReadOnlyNode<int>(Enumerable.Range(1,1000));

You can use this with any collection that implements IEnumerable (pretty much all built-in collections do, and you can use OfType() to turn non-generic ICollections and IEnumerables into generic IEnumerables). The only thing to worry about is the call stack; there is a limit to how many method calls you can nest, which may cause an SOE on a finite but large list of inputs.

EDIT: JaredPar brings up a very good point; this solution uses Count() and Any() which have to take the results of Skip() into account, and so cannot use the "shortcuts" built into these methods that can use the cardinality property of a collection class. Those calls become linear, which squares the complexity of the algorithm. If you just use the basic members of IEnumerable instead, this becomes much more performant:

public class ReadOnlyNode<T>
{
    public readonly T Value;
    public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Next;
    public readonly ReadOnlyNode<T> Prev;

    private ReadOnlyNode(IEnumerator<T> elements, ReadOnlyNode<T> prev, bool first)
    {
        if (elements == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("elements");

        var empty = false;
        if (first) 
           empty = elements.MoveNext();

        if(!empty)
        {
           Value = elements.Current;
           Next = elements.MoveNext() ? new ReadOnlyNode<T>(elements, this, false) : null;
           Prev = prev;
        }
    }

    public ReadOnlyNode(IEnumerable<T> elements)
        : this(elements.GetEnumerator(), null, true)
    {
    }
}

With this solution, you lose a little of the more elegant error-checking, but if the IEnumerable is null an exception would have been thrown anyway.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that this solution causes many unnecessary traversals of the original collection. Because of the way Skip works every call to Count will traverse the entire collection even though it will only count the resulting elements. Additionally Any will traverse the previous N skipped elements at every stage in the list. The reason I went with IEnumerator<T> in my solution is that it guarantees the original collection is only traversed once. –  JaredPar May 25 '12 at 17:24
    
I have to agree with JaredPar, his code looks elegant. –  Aleksey Bykov May 25 '12 at 17:26
    
True. You can put your enumerator logic into my solution though. I'll edit –  KeithS May 25 '12 at 17:28
    
This answer still contains the broken implementation that unexpectedly evaluates the input sequence three times. Such code should never make it to production; it is buggy. This is not specific to Skip; that was only an example Jared gave. It is also not merely bad performance; it violates the expected semantics. You must not evaluate a given IEnumerable<T> more than once unless the semantics of the method explicitly call for it (which in this case they don’t). –  Timwi Dec 16 '13 at 6:59
    
Furthermore, your solution throws an InvalidOperationException with the cryptic message “Enumeration already finished.” when the input collection is empty because you call Current on an exhausted enumerator. –  Timwi Dec 16 '13 at 7:03

Yes, you can make a "link-setter" object used for setting the links, that you send into the constructor of the node, or have a static create method that returns the "link-setter". The links in the node are private, and can only be accessed through the "link-setter", and when you have used them to set up the list, you throw them away.

However, that's a pretty useless exercise. If the list is immutable, it's pointless to use a doubly linked list when a simple array works better.

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I agree with the "useless" statement only to some extent, sometimes lists are more convenient for traversing and more efficient in terms of utilizing memory (arrays require unfragmented memory) –  Aleksey Bykov May 25 '12 at 15:51
    
@bonomo: For an array of value types, it's often a great advantage when traversing it that it uses unfragmented memory, as it's very likely that the following items already are in the memory cache. For an array of reference types, it's only the references that need a piece of unfragmented memory, the actual objects don't. –  Guffa May 25 '12 at 16:10
    
true, I agree with that, however arrays aren't immutable if that matters –  Aleksey Bykov May 25 '12 at 16:16
    
@bonomo: What I meant was of course that you can make a thin wrapper around an array instead of creating all the logic for handing a linked list. :) –  Guffa May 25 '12 at 16:18

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