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I have a Windows 8 XAML page with a grid in it that shows sample text in 100+ different fonts. The sample text is the same in each grid view item and can be changed using a textbox at the top of the page.

Every time you type a character all the grid view items are updated. The problem is that this is noticeably slow. Particularly if you type quickly.

I'm not sure what is making it so slow. Is it updating all the grid view items including the ones not on screen? Is something else causing the problem and this particular binding is just a red herring?

Here is my binding code (I've removed some xaml from my data template to make it clearer):

<ScrollViewer>
    <GridView x:Name="FontGridView" ItemsSource="{Binding Fonts}" SelectionMode="Multiple"  Margin="116,0,40,46">
        <GridView.ItemTemplate>
            <DataTemplate>
                <Grid Width="600" MinHeight="100" MaxHeight="120">
                    <TextBox Text="{Binding ElementName=pageRoot, Path=DataContext.SampleText, Mode=OneWay}"
                                FontFamily="{Binding FamilyName}" FontSize="32" Background="Transparent" />
                </Grid>
            </DataTemplate>
        </GridView.ItemTemplate>
    </GridView>
</ScrollViewer>

Is there a better way to do this, or are there any other performance tuning things I can turn on?

UPDATE: You're less likely to make this mistake since Visual Studio 2012 RC came out. The templates for WinRT apps no longer use a ScrollViewer in this way. I'm keeping the question here for those that have ported apps they created using Visual Studio 2011.

share|improve this question
    
Just checking: the FamilyName property you are binding to is a real simple one, right? I just want to rule out the possibility that reading that property is too slow. –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 21:45
    
It's a string property, with a simple getter that just returns a stored value. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 22:00
    
I need the ScrollViewer to get the metro style left margin, but could that be hindering the grid view's ability to virtualise? –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 22:03
    
I'm not sure. But you don't need the scollviewer to get the left margin. See my answer to stackoverflow.com/questions/10737656/… for an alternative: change the ItemsPanelTemplate to a WrapGrid (or VariableSizeWrapGrid) with a margin. –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 22:06
    
Thinking again, it might indeed kill virtualization. Additionally, it will kill support for mouse wheel scrolling, as discussed in that question I mentioned above. –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 22:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Try removing the ScrollViewer.

Because the GridView is inside a scrollviewer, it is effectively given an infinite width. That might kill the virtualization of the WrapGrid in the GridView.

Furthermore, the GridView internally contains a ScrollViewer already. Obviously, you don't need two of them. But the inner ScrollViewer will also eat mouse wheel events, leaving no events for the outer ScrollViewer to react to. As a result scrolling with the mouse will not work.

Visual Studio 11 (bèta 1) templates contain code like this, to set a margin on the GridView. However, it's better to set a margin on the GridView's ItemsPanel, like this:

<GridView x:Name="FontGridView" ItemsSource="{Binding Fonts}" SelectionMode="Multiple">
  <GridView.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <Grid Width="600" MinHeight="100" MaxHeight="120">
        <TextBox Text="{Binding ElementName=pageRoot, Path=DataContext.SampleText, Mode=OneWay}"
                 FontFamily="{Binding FamilyName}" FontSize="32" Background="Transparent" />
      </Grid>
    </DataTemplate>
  </GridView.ItemTemplate>
  <GridView.ItemsPanel>
    <ItemsPanelTemplate>
      <WrapGrid x:Name="itemGridViewPanel" Margin="116,53,116,46"/>
    </ItemsPanelTemplate>
  </GridView.ItemsPanel>
</GridView>

Your original code did not include the Margin that you set on the GridView. But whatever it was, set the same Margin on the WrapGrid.

Notice also that I gave the WrapGrid a name. You can use that name to change the Margin when the screen orientation changes, typically as follows:

<VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>
  <VisualStateGroup>
    <VisualState x:Name="FullScreenLandscape"/>
    <VisualState x:Name="Filled"/>
    <VisualState x:Name="FullScreenPortrait">
      <Storyboard>
        <ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames Storyboard.TargetName="itemGridViewPanel"
                                       Storyboard.TargetProperty="Margin">
          <DiscreteObjectKeyFrame KeyTime="0" 
                                  Value="96,53,96,46"/>
        </ObjectAnimationUsingKeyFrames>
      </Storyboard>
    </VisualState>
    <VisualState x:Name="Snapped"/>
  </VisualStateGroup>
</VisualStateManager.VisualStateGroups>

UPDATE:

I had done this before, but with a VariableSizedWrapGrid. That produces the correct layout, but unfortunately, I'm afraid that VariableSizedWrapGrid is not a virtualizing panel.

WrapGrid is virtualizing, but the behavior at the left margin seems wrong when scrolling. It is correct at the right margin though.

Oh well, in two weeks time we should have the release candidate available. Hopefully things will have improved...

UPDATE:

It seems that Microsoft is aware of this. See http://social.msdn.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winappswithcsharp/thread/17385f7d-aadc-4edc-bbff-8738a2f0c917.

UPDATE:

It seems that the WrapGrid has not been fixed in the Release Candidate.

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I'm pretty sure this has sorted it. There has been a big speed improvement and it seems to have fixed some other performance issues I was having. Left margin behaviour not correct, but hopefully that is a bug rather than a feature and will be fixed. –  Richard Garside May 26 '12 at 16:35
    
Much easier solution now works in Release Preview (aka RC). You can now just add padding to the GridView and you no longer need to mess with the ItemsPanel. –  Richard Garside Jun 1 '12 at 22:30

Try using a VirtualizingStackPanel

<GridView.ItemsPanel>
    <ItemsPanelTemplate>
        <VirtualizingStackPanel Orientation="Horizontal"/>
    </ItemsPanelTemplate>
</GridView.ItemsPanel>
share|improve this answer
    
That won't help. First of all, he's using a grid view, probably because he wants wrapping. Secondly, the GridView's panel is virtualized already (it's a WrapGrid I believe) –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 19:17
    
Kris is correct, this produces the wrong layout, and doesn't seem to speed things up. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 21:36
    
It did seem promising though. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 21:42

Simplify your data template.

<DataTemplate>
  <TextBlock Text="{Binding ElementName=pageRoot, Path=DataContext.SampleText}"
             Width="600" MinHeight="100" MaxHeight="120"
             FontFamily="{Binding FamilyName}" FontSize="32" />
</DataTemplate>

You don't need the Grid. And it looks like you don't need a (complex) TextBox either, just a (simple) TextBlock.

Also, fixing the height of those text blocks (Height="120") might help (optimize) the layout process.

UPDATE:

I understand you're code is simplified from "the real thing". But that might hide the real problem for us. Remember, the data template is intantiated for every item that is on screen. The more complex it is, the more objects need to be instantiated (CPU and memory usage), possibly need to databind (CPU), need to be measured and laid out (CPU), and need to be rendered (CPU and GPU).

Just do a test with a very simple data template. If your program is faster now, or not, you know whether the data template is the performance problem or not.

Note that the complexity of the data template is not measured by the number of xaml elements you need to describe it, as those elements may have very different internal complexities. For example, do prefer a TextBlock over a TextBox if all you need to do is display text, not allow editing.

Also, if some of these elements have a lot of properties set, do use styles to set them. Using a style on many objects is more efficient than setting many properties on many objects, especially when it come to memory usage. And the less memory you use, the faster your program will be (due to modern CPU multilevel caching architectures).

For example:

<GridView x:Name="FontGridView" ItemsSource="{Binding Fonts}" SelectionMode="Multiple">
  <GridView.Resources>
    <Style TargetType="TextBlock">
      <Setter Property="Width" Value="600" />
      <Setter Property="MinHeight" Value="100" />
      <Setter Property="MaxHeight" Value="120" />
      <Setter Property="FontSize" Value="32" />
    </Style>
  </GridView.Resources>
  <GridView.ItemTemplate>
    <DataTemplate>
      <TextBlock Text="{Binding ElementName=pageRoot, Path=DataContext.SampleText}"
                 FontFamily="{Binding FamilyName}" />
    </DataTemplate>
  </GridView.ItemTemplate>
</GridView>
share|improve this answer
    
I should have made it clear. The actual template has more in it that I removed to make my question clearer. Although, looks like it actually made it less clear. So, sorry, I do need the grid to layout the other elements. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 20:58
    
To see if my DataTemplate was the issue, I simplified it to match your suggested one. There wasn't a noticeable improvement, so I don't think this is the problem. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 21:20
    
Hmmm. I just updated my answer to include that suggestion. I'll leave it in for others reading this page. –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 21:42
    
RE Update 2: The grid is bound to the collection Fonts, the item template is bound to properties of the Font objects in that collection. FamilyName is a property of Font and SampleText is a string property in root DataContext. So, that's why I need to refer back. –  Richard Garside May 25 '12 at 22:11
    
Maybe the fact that you are binding to a font name, as opposed to binding to a font, causes fonts to be created for each item? That could potentially be slow... –  Kris Vandermotten May 25 '12 at 22:18

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