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Consider the following overly simplified chunk of XML:

<ElementA>
   <AttributeValue DataType="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#integer">5
   </AttributeValue>
</ElementA>

Specifically, looking at the AttributeValue element, from the DataType attribute, I know that my value is of type integer (though it could have been a double, string, datetime...any established datatype from the w3 standard). I would like to deserialize this xml to a .NET class with the strongly typed value. The first thing that came to my mind is to create a generic AttributeValue class:

public class AttributeValue<T>
{
    public T Value {get; set;}
}

but of course this won't work for a couple of reasons - the biggest one being I would have to declare the type in the parent class which won't compile because T is not defined:

public class ElementA
{
    public AttributeValue<T> {get; set; }  // Naturally, this will not work because T
}                                          // is not defined.

Plus, I would likely have to implement IXmlSerializable on my class to handle the custom serialization.

Is there a better way to solve this problem? I know I can serialize the DataType attribute in my code and store the value as a string, then convert later, but it would be helpful to actually have the correct type in my business object for later processing

Thanks for any help!

Jason

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3 Answers 3

Well I know this is not an exact answer to your question, but you could implement a solution using dynamics in .Net 4. here is an example:

public class DynamicElement : DynamicObject
{
    public Dictionary<string, object> Attributes
    {
        get { return lst; }
    }

    private Dictionary<string, object> lst;

    public DynamicElement()
    {
        lst = new Dictionary<string, object>(StringComparer.InvariantCultureIgnoreCase);
    }

    public bool Present(string name)
    {
        if (lst == null) return false;
        if (!lst.ContainsKey(name)) return false;

        return true;
    }

    public override bool TryGetMember(GetMemberBinder binder, out object result)
    {
        var name = binder.Name;
        result = null;

        if (lst == null) return false;
        if (!lst.ContainsKey(name)) return false;

        result = lst[name];
        return true;
    }
    public override bool TrySetMember(SetMemberBinder binder, object value)
    {
        var name = binder.Name;

        if (lst == null) return false;

        if (!lst.ContainsKey(name))
            lst.Add(name, value);
        else
            lst[name] = value;

        return true;
    }
}

And then to use it, it would be similar to this:

dynamic d = new DynamicElement();
d.AttributeValue = Convert.ToInt32(xmlElement.Value);
d.Done = true; //just another example.

later:

public void something(DynamicElement de)
{
    dynamic d = de;
    if(d.Done) //remember, defined this above.. just an example.
    {
        int someValue = d.AttributeValue;
    }
}

The downside, is there will be no intellisense. It's all resolved at run-time. You can also check if a value is present with the d.Present("AttributeName"); Sorry if it doesn't quite compile. I wrote it in notepad :)

EDIT:

It shouldn't be hard to implement serialization, either - because all you have to do is iterate over the attributes dictionary.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

I appreciate your answer @caesay and I did implement it, but I'm not sure I require that type of functionality (to be able to add multiple properties to the dictionary). While I do use dynamo in dire need in my code, I try to avoid it where possible.

Instead, I implemented the following structure to retain the generic type within my parent class:

public class AttributeValueElement : XACMLElement
{

    public AttributeValueElement()
        : base(XacmlSchema.Context)
    {

    }

    [XmlAttribute]
    public string DataType { get; set; }


    [XmlText]
    public string Value 
    { 
        get { return DataValue.GetValue().ToString(); }
        set
        {
            DataValue = AttributeValueFactory.Create(DataType, value);   
        }
    }

    public AttributeValue DataValue { get; set; }        
}


public abstract class AttributeValue
{
    public AttributeValue()
    {

    }
    public abstract object GetValue();
}

public class AttributeValue<T> : AttributeValue
{
    public T Value { get; set; }
    public override object GetValue()
    {
        return Value;
    }
}

And a corresponding factory class to create the attribute value:

public static AttributeValue Create(string xacmlDataType, string value)
    {

        AttributeValue _attributeValue = null;

        switch (xacmlDataType)
        {
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#string":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#x500Name":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#ipAddress":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dnsName":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#xPathExpression":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<string> { Value = value };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#boolean":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<bool> {Value = XmlConvert.ToBoolean(value) };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#integer":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<int> { Value = XmlConvert.ToInt32(value) };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#double":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<double> { Value = XmlConvert.ToDouble(value) };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#time":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#date":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dateTime":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<DateTime> { Value = XmlConvert.ToDateTime(value, XmlDateTimeSerializationMode.Utc) };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#anyURI":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<Uri> { Value = new Uri(value) };
                break;
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#hexInteger":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<byte[]> { Value = Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes(value) };
                break;          
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#dayTimeDuration":
            case "http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema#yearMonthDuration":
                _attributeValue = new AttributeValue<TimeSpan> { Value = XmlConvert.ToTimeSpan(value) };
                break;                
            default:
                throw new NotImplementedException("Data type '" + xacmlDataType + "' is not a supported type.");
        }           

        return _attributeValue;
    }

I hate to answer my own question on stackoverflow, but sometimes it happens.

Thanks for the responses guys!

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What you're trying to do really can't be done. You have a dynamic structure (XML whose data fields can be of arbitrary types), and you want to have a strongly-typed definition in your class. If it's to be strongly typed, you should know the type at compile type, which you don't. @caesay's suggestion is a good one, or simply representing the data as Object would work as well, but you can't have a compiler check (i.e., strong typing) if you don't know the information at compile-time.

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My bad, fixed it... –  carlosfigueira May 26 '12 at 13:49

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