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I got asked to write a little PHP script that takes some POSTed input from a few drop down boxes which give some selectable criteria and at the end, spits out one or more string variables containing unique codes.

The variable names are of the form $thingPlaceType, and each one is unique. The drop down boxes allow for selection of:

  • either one "thing" or all "things" together
  • either one "place" or all "places" together
  • either one "type" or all "types" together

I can't figure out how to select these codes without resorting to nested switch statements where I do

switch($_POST['thing'])
{
  case "thing1":
     switch($_POST['place'])
     {
       case "place1":
          switch($_POST['type'])
          {
            case "type1":
               $output = $thing1Place1Type1;
            case "type2":
               $output = $thing1Place1Type2;
            case "alltypes":
               $output = $thing1Place1Type1.$thing1Place1Type2.$thing1PlaceType3;
           }
        case "place2":
        ...
        case "allplaces":
        ...
      }
  case "thing2":
     switch($_POST['place'])
     {
       case "place1":
          switch($_POST['type'])
          {
            case "type1":
               $output = $thing1Place1Type1;
            ...
      ...
  ...
}

It seems that the code is turning into the Arrow Anti-Pattern. I'm thinking I could possibly do something using multi-dimensional arrays, or maybe a single array where I match the values against the keys. But I feel that's clutching at straws and there must be something I'm missing. Is it time to turn the strings into proper objects with properties?

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1  
These variables like '$thing1Place1Type1' - is this just pseudo-code, or do you actually need to evaluate a variable name? –  Mick Sear May 25 '12 at 16:13
1  
Any time you have a bunch of variables with very similar names there's a good chance you need to reevaluate your design. E.g. $thing1place1, $thing1place2, etc. maps very naturally to e.g. $things_places = array( 1 => array( 1 => 'some place', 2 => 'another place' ), 2 => ... ); (or you could use explicit key names too, e.g. 'places' => array( 1 => ... )). Move to a more sensible data model and you'll find issues like this much easier to manage, if not nonexistent. –  Jordan May 25 '12 at 16:24
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

if you want to convert them to objects.. you can create this.

  class Object {
        private $thing;
        private $place;
        private $type;

        public function __construct() {
            $this->thing = $_POST['thing'];
            $this->place = $_POST['place'];
            $this->type  = $_POST['type'];

            $this->processThing($this->thing, $this->place, $this->type);
        }

        public function processThing($thing = false, $place = false, $type = false) {
               //noW that you have all the properties you just need just process it
        }

    }

    if(isset($_POST['thing']) && isset($_POST['place']) && isset($_POST['type'])) {
        $object = new Object();
    }
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This was closest to what I had to do in the end. I built objects and got the Thing, Place, Type properties from the variable name itself. Then it was much easier to actually just do a few if ($thing && $place && $type) statements. –  Biggles May 29 '12 at 10:06
    
This looks like exactly the logic I'd use to write a function for auto-filling XML schema. You may have just put me on to a really good idea for a page function. –  Imperative Sep 29 '13 at 22:13
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You need to re-factor your code into functions. For example:-

switch($_POST['thing'])
{
  case "thing1":
      $result = processThings($thing1);
      break;
  case "thing2":
      $result = processThings($thing2);
      break;
}

function processThings($thing)
{
    //processing code goes here
}

I'm sure you get the idea. You can have further switch blocks in the functions if you wish, this will avoid your anti-pattern and make your code easier to understand.

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This helped, but it was still a barely maintainable mess afterwards, so I had to rewrite the whole section. –  Biggles May 29 '12 at 9:40
    
@Biggles have a look at this answer too. stackoverflow.com/a/106482/212940 –  vascowhite May 29 '12 at 10:04
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Well, if you can find a way to avoid people compromising your site - perhaps by using prefixes on the target variable names, then you might be able to do this:

$variableName = "A prefix_".$_POST['thing'].$_POST['type'].$_POST['place'];

$evaluatedVariable = $$variableName;

These are called 'variable variables'. Probably I'll get flamed for using them, but I've found them useful in the past if you can use them responsibly.

Of course, this wouldn't directly work for your 'alltypes' case. You could use the suggestion to refactor into functions

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Thats terribly unsafe, and a bad suggestion. Perhaps it won't be as much, if you added if (in_array($_POST['thing'],array("thing1","thing2"))){..} first before using it. –  Thrustmaster May 25 '12 at 16:23
    
Yes, that could work - that was the reason for the prefix, of course - it's restricting the possible variables that could be evaluated –  Mick Sear May 25 '12 at 16:25
    
Upvoted this. I did try an idea along those lines because I could validate the input easily enough to make sure it was safe (plus it isn't web facing anyway). However it got complicated due to the "all" selections. –  Biggles May 29 '12 at 9:39
    
Thanks Biggles :) It's a bit of a 'marmite' feature, and you certainly need to bear security in mind as people are quick to point out. Can be useful in some contexts, for sure. –  Mick Sear May 29 '12 at 10:58
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Depending on the real values and the number of combinations you could concatenate the string:

switch($_POST['thing'] . '-' . $_POST['place'] . '-' . $_POST['type'])
{
  case "thing1-place1-type1":
    $output = $thing1Place1Type1;
  case "thing1-place1-type2":
    $output = $thing1Place1Type2;
  case "thing1-place1-alltypes":
    $output = $thing1Place1Type1.$thing1Place1Type2.$thing1PlaceType3;
  case "thing1-place2-...":
    ...
  case "thing2-...":
    ...
}
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