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I am having hard time understanding how a decorated recursive function works. For the following snippet:

def dec(f):
    def wrapper(*argv):
        print(argv, 'Decorated!')
        return(f(*argv))
    return(wrapper)

def f(n):
    print(n, 'Original!')
    if n == 1: return(1)
    else: return(f(n - 1) + n)

print(f(5))
print

dec_f = dec(f)
print(dec_f(5))
print

f = dec(f)
print(f(5))

The output is:

(5, 'Original!')
(4, 'Original!')
(3, 'Original!')
(2, 'Original!')
(1, 'Original!')
15

((5,), 'Decorated!')
(5, 'Original!')
(4, 'Original!')
(3, 'Original!')
(2, 'Original!')
(1, 'Original!')
15

((5,), 'Decorated!')
(5, 'Original!')
((4,), 'Decorated!')
(4, 'Original!')
((3,), 'Decorated!')
(3, 'Original!')
((2,), 'Decorated!')
(2, 'Original!')
((1,), 'Decorated!')
(1, 'Original!')
15

The first one prints f(n) so naturally it prints 'Original' every time f(n) is called recursively.

The second one prints def_f(n), so when n is passed to wrapper it calls f(n) recursively. But the wrapper itself is not recursive so only one 'Decorated' is printed.

The third one puzzles me, which is the same as using decorator @dec. Why does decorated f(n) calls the wrapper five times also? It looks to me that def_f=dec(f) and f=dec(f) are just two keywords bound to two identical function objects. Is there something else going on when the decorated function is given the same name as the undecorated one?

Thanks!

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1  
the reference to the original f function still exists, thus that one is called. When you do f = dec(f), you will always call the new function. And the new function will call the original. –  JBernardo May 25 '12 at 16:13
    
decorator might not be the right term to use here, as you never actually apply a decorator to the function. Your last test of f = dec(f) is almost (if not exactly) the same as @dec def f –  Haldean Brown May 25 '12 at 17:33

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you said, the first one is called as usual.

the second one puts a decorated version of f called dec_f in the global scope. Dec_f is called, so that prints "Decorated!", but inside the f function passed to dec, you call f itself, not dec_f. the name f is looked up and found in the global scope, where it is still defined without the wrapper, so from than on, only f gets called.

in the 3re example, you assign the decorated version to the name f, so when inside the function f, the name f is looked up, it looks in the global scope, finds f, which is now the decorated version.

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Thanks! This is what I was looking for. So the problem is the return(f(n-1)+n) statement in the def f, where f(n-1) is the new dec(f) now. –  jianglai May 25 '12 at 17:43

All assignment in Python is just binding names to objects. When you have

f = dec(f)

what you are doing is binding the name f to the return value of dec(f). At that point, f no longer refers to the original function. The original function still exists and is called by the new f, but you don't have a named reference to the original function anymore.

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Your function invokes something called f, which python looks up in the enclosing scope.

Until the statement f = dec(f), f is still bound to the unwrapped function, so that's what is getting called.

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