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The following code:

library(ggplot2)
theData <- data.frame(category <- sample(LETTERS[1:3], 1000, replace = T),
                  value <- rnorm(1000))
thePlot <- ggplot(theData,
              aes(x = category, y = value))
thePlot <- thePlot + geom_violin(fill = "BLACK")
thePlot <- thePlot + coord_flip()
print(thePlot)

will produce this plot:

violin plot example

But I would like to achieve an effect whereby the alpha value of the fill (and colour, ideally) of each violin density decreases in less-dense areas. That is, the violin shape fades into the background where the height of the curve is small, but is dark and opaque where the curve is tall. Something like this type of effect:

alpha fade example

Unfortunately, those coefficient plots are produced by use of a pretty ugly hack, and given the flexibility of the new geom_violin, I am wondering if there is a straightforward way to implement this alpha fade in the use of geom_violin.

Thanks for any insight you can offer!

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2  
Not easily. The violins themselves are drawn as a filled polygon, which can only have a single fill color. It may be possible to pull out the data that defines the violin (the density estimate) and then plot separate segments (with separate colors/alphas), but you would have to build up something yourself to do that. –  Brian Diggs May 25 '12 at 18:08
    
Thanks for the answer; I feared that this might be the case. –  isDotR May 28 '12 at 14:54

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Inspired at @wch's answer, I decided to take another crack at this. This was as close as I got:

ggplot(theData, aes(x = category, y = value)) +
    stat_ydensity(geom="segment", aes(xend=..x..+..scaled../2, 
        yend=..y.., alpha=..scaled..), size=2, trim=FALSE) +
    stat_ydensity(geom="segment", aes(xend=..x..-..scaled../2, 
        yend=..y.., alpha=..scaled..), size=2, trim=FALSE) +
    scale_alpha_continuous(range= c(0, 1)) +
    coord_flip() + theme_bw()

enter image description here

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Hm, I noticed some of those bands in my version as well, but they're a lot more obvious with your version. My guess is that they have something to do with the segments overlapping a little. I tried playing with the linejoin and lineend in the geom code, but I didn't succeed in making the bands away. –  wch Jun 12 '12 at 19:42
    
I tried to overcome the banding problem by changing the size argument, so that each segment overlaps its neighbor to a greater degree, but found no satisfactory solution. That said, this is the best attempt I've seen so far, so thanks! –  isDotR Jun 13 '12 at 13:50

It actually is possible, by using some tricks with stat_ydensity:

library(ggplot2)
theData <- data.frame(category <- sample(LETTERS[1:3], 1000, replace = T),
                  value <- rnorm(1000))

ggplot(theData, aes(x = category, y = value)) +
    stat_ydensity(geom="line", aes(alpha=..scaled..), size=2, trim=FALSE) +
    scale_alpha_continuous(range= c(0, 1)) +
    coord_flip() + theme_bw()
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