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Simple question, but I can't quite seem to figure it out:

If i have an integer, say 12, and I perform the following bit-manipulation on it:

int i = 12;
i = (i << 3) + (i << 1);

I end up with 120 (12*10). This is the case with any number.

Can someone explain to me, succinctly, why it is that this works? (I'm obviously missing something quite rudimentary when it comes to bitshifting).

Thanks

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3  
Do you know how bitshifting works? i << 3 is i*(2^3) or i*8, and i << 1 is i*(2^1) or i*2, so if you add those, you get i*10. –  Mr Lister May 25 '12 at 16:19
    
2  
Also note that any decent compiler will do this better than you... Just use plain multiplication and the optimizer will do what's best for you in the current platform. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 25 '12 at 16:54
    
In agreement with David's comment: Please do not do this when you want to multiply. You can also divide by powers of 2 using >> operations, and in some cases substitute & for %. But that's not what bitwise operators are for. –  Brian McFarland May 25 '12 at 17:37

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Express as multiplication.

i = (i << 3) + (i << 1);
i = (i * 8) + (i * 2);
i = 8i + 2i
i = 10i
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You are basically doing:

i = i*2^3 + i*2
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i << 3 is equivalent to i * 8. i << 1 is equivalent to i * 2.

The distribute property tells us that:

x = i * 10
x = i * (8 + 2)
x = 8i + 2i
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Shifting left by 3 places is equal to multiplying by 8, shifting by 1 places is equal to multiplying by 2 so you are doing

i = i * 8 + i * 2
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Rewrite the bitshifts as multiplications by powers-of-2, and all should become clear.

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Left bitshift is the same (usually) as multiplying by power's of two. i.e. << 1 is equivalent to *(2^1) , << 2 is equivalent to *(2^2) and so on...

If you substitute that into your example you can see why your result is multiplied by 10:

int i = 12;
i = (i * 2^3) + (i * 2^1);
= { i = (i * 8) + (i * 2);}
= { i = 8i + 2i; }
= { i = 10i; }
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