Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Here is my case.

bash ~]# TIME="2012-05-25 06:42:57"
bash ~]# echo "2012-05-25 00:16:51,610" | awk -v var=$TIME '{if ($0 < var) print $0}'

Then, here is the error message

awk: 06:42:57
awk:   ^ syntax error

I just want to pass a date range to my awk command. How to archive this? Please help. Thanks.

Modify the case

START_TIME="2012-05-24 00:00:00"
END_TIME="2012-05-24 01:00:00"
echo "2012-05-24 00:10:10" | awk -v "START=$START_TIME" -v "END=$END_TIME" '{ if ( $0 > START && $0 < END) print $0 }'

It seems not working in IF conditions.

awk: { if ( $0 < START && $0 > END) print $0 }
awk:                           ^ syntax error

After serval trying, seems found the solution with another approach.

echo "2012-05-24 00:10:10" | awk '{ if ( $0 > "'"$START_TIME"'" && $0 < "'"$END_TIME"'" ) print $0 }'

Not sure how to do it with awk variable "-v". Anyone have idears?

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Quote your variable when passing it to AWK:

echo "2012-05-25 00:16:51,610" | awk -v "var=$TIME" '{if ($0 < var) print $0}'
share|improve this answer
    
... Or just awk "\$0 < \"$TIME\"" but be careful with the quoting! –  tripleee May 25 '12 at 16:54
    
@tripleee: I don't recommend embedding shell variables for just that reason. Using -v variable passing prevents those issues. –  Dennis Williamson May 25 '12 at 18:05
    
@DennisWilliamson Thanks, it works in that case, but if I change the case, why it not working ? echo "2012-05-24 00:10:10" | awk -v "START=$START_TIME" -v "END=$END_TIME" '{ if ( $0 < START && $0 > END) print $0 }' –  phyerbarte May 26 '12 at 4:21
1  
@phyerbarte: END is a reserved word in AWK. Try another variable name. Also $0 < START && $0 > END doesn't make any sense. Perhaps you mean $0 > START && $0 < END or $0 < START || $0 > END. You should use lower case or mixed case variable names. –  Dennis Williamson May 26 '12 at 6:23
    
Thanks @DennisWilliamson, you are right, I cannot use "END" as the variable name in the awk. And yeah, you are right, the logic was reversed...by the way, why it is better to use lower case or mixed case as variable names? Is that can avoid some mistakes or other advantages? Is there some kind of standard exists? If yes, where I can find it? Just wandering how to write shell script with a good style. Like C++ standard from google.etc –  phyerbarte May 26 '12 at 17:05

At least on my system, it appears that "END" is a reserved word even for variables. Awk uses END as it uses BEGIN, but I hadn't seen attempts to use it as a variable before. Note:

[ghoti@pc ~]$ START_TIME="2012-05-24 00:00:00"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ END_TIME="2012-05-24 01:00:00"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo "2012-05-24 00:10:10" | awk -v "START=$START_TIME" -v "END=$END_TIME" '{ if ( $0 < START && $0 > END) print $0 }'
awk: syntax error at source line 1
 context is
        { if ( $0 < START && $0 > >>>  END <<< ) print $0 }
awk: illegal statement at source line 1
[ghoti@pc ~]$ echo "2012-05-24 00:10:10" | awk -v s_time="$START_TIME" -v e_time="$END_TIME" '{ if ( $0 < s_time && $0 > e_time) print $0 }'
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

Obviously this still isn't working, but now it's not working because of a misunderstanding about how comparisons work, rather than because we're trying to use a reserved word as a variable.

Looking at your if statement, it seems that you're trying to evaluate TRUE only if the comparison string is both BEFORE the start date and AFTER the end date. Barring theories of time being circular, I think we can assume that this logic is flawed.

So here's what I came up with. Note that this uses gawk's mktime() function, so it won't work everywhere.

[ghoti@pc ~]$ START_TIME="2012-05-24 00:00:00"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ END_TIME="2012-05-24 01:00:00"
[ghoti@pc ~]$ printf '2012-05-23 22:10:10\n2012-05-24 00:10:10\n2012-05-24 01:10:10\n' | gawk -v s_time="$START_TIME" -v e_time="$END_TIME" 'BEGIN { s=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G",s_time)); e=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G",e_time)); } { now=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G")); if ( now > s && now < e) print $0 }'
2012-05-24 00:10:10
[ghoti@pc ~]$ 

Spaced out for easier reading, the gawk script looks like this:

BEGIN {
    s=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G",s_time));
    e=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G",e_time));
}
{
    now=mktime(gensub(/[^0-9]/," ","G"));
    if ( now > s && now < e) print $0;
}

Obviously, this relies completely on the fact that your date/time specification matches mktime()'s input format so closely. But it works with the sample data in your question.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @ghoti, seems it explain what happend exactlly, yes, the original date logic is wrong, but the key point is I'm using the "END" as the variable name in the awk. mktime is another option to achive my case, thanks again. DennisWilliamson came first, so I will accept his solution. –  phyerbarte May 26 '12 at 16:58
    
@phyerbarte, it seems that Denis didn't mention the cause of your problem (the END reserved word) until after my post, but whatever. Thanks at least for the upvote. –  ghoti May 29 '12 at 14:30

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.