Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java, is there any way to get(catch) all exceptions instead of catch the exception individually?

share|improve this question
1  
and I will catch all those specific Exceptions with catch(Exception e){}?? –  Johanna Jul 2 '09 at 18:21
    
yeah. Since Exception is the base class of all exceptions, it will catch any exception. –  jjnguy Jul 2 '09 at 18:23
1  
@ jjnguy:thanks for your good explanation. –  Johanna Jul 2 '09 at 18:55
    
I'm glad it was helpful. –  jjnguy Jul 2 '09 at 18:57

6 Answers 6

up vote 31 down vote accepted

If you want, you can add throws clauses to your methods. Then you don't have to catch checked methods right away. That way, you can catch the exceptions later (perhaps at the same time as other exceptions).

The code looks like:

public void someMethode() throws SomeCheckedException {

    //  code

}

Then later you can deal with the exceptions if you don't wanna deal with them in that method.

To catch all exceptions some block of code may throw you can do: (This will also catch Exceptions you wrote yourself)

try {

    // exceptional block of code ...

    // ...

} catch (Exception e){

    // Deal with e as you please.
    //e may be any type of exception at all.

}

The reason that works is because Exception is the base class for all exceptions. Thus any exception that may get thrown is an Exception (Uppercase 'E').

If you want to handle your own exceptions first simply add a catch block before the generic Exception one.

try{    
}catch(MyOwnException me){
}catch(Exception e){
}
share|improve this answer

While I agree it's not good style to catch a raw Exception, there are ways of handling exceptions which provide for superior logging, and the ability to handle the unexpected. Since you are in an exceptional state, you are probably more interested in getting good information than in response time, so instanceof performance shouldn't be a big hit.

try{
    // IO code
} catch (Exception e){
    if(e instanceof IOException){
        // handle this exception type
    } else if (e instanceof AnotherExceptionType){
        //handle this one
    } else {
        // We didn't expect this one. What could it be? Let's log it, and let it bubble up the hierarchy.
        throw e;
    }
}

However, this doesn't take into consideration the fact that IO can also throw Errors. Errors are not Exceptions. Errors are a under a different inheritance hierarchy than Exceptions, though both share the base class Throwable. Since IO can throw Errors, you may want to go so far as to catch Throwable

try{
    // IO code
} catch (Throwable t){
    if(t instanceof Exception){
        if(t instanceof IOException){
            // handle this exception type
        } else if (t instanceof AnotherExceptionType){
            //handle this one
        } else {
            // We didn't expect this Exception. What could it be? Let's log it, and let it bubble up the hierarchy.
        }
    } else if (t instanceof Error){
        if(t instanceof IOError){
            // handle this Error
        } else if (t instanceof AnotherError){
            //handle different Error
        } else {
            // We didn't expect this Error. What could it be? Let's log it, and let it bubble up the hierarchy.
        }
    } else {
        // This should never be reached, unless you have subclassed Throwable for your own purposes.
        throw t;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for talking about Throwable vs exception –  qwerty9967 Dec 6 '12 at 20:38
1  
Why not use multiple catch blocks? –  Carl G Feb 9 at 7:14
    
I would argue that you should catch each exception explicitly, but the question explicitly asked how to catch everything a block of code would throw. –  codethulhu Feb 17 at 16:15
    
That throwable was useful. –  Anshul May 21 at 7:21

Catch the base exception 'Exception'

   try { 
         //some code
   } catch (Exception e) {
        //catches exception and all subclasses 
   }
share|improve this answer
2  
If you write this code, you are almost certainly doing something terribly wrong. –  George May 2 '13 at 3:40
    
@George Why did you say that? –  kuchi Jun 20 '13 at 17:24
    
@George Not necessarily, if you deal with something that has a lot of sensitive entry parameters and it is very complicated to verify the validity of each one of them, catching all kind of exceptions once the working cases are properly tested is the way to go. It will make the code clear and way less mindf*k than a huge and potentially heavy condition. –  Johnride Nov 15 '13 at 18:53

It is bad practice to catch Exception -- it's just too broad, and you may miss something like a NullPointerException in your own code.

For most file operations, IOException is the root exception. Better to catch that, instead.

share|improve this answer

Do you mean catch an Exception of any type that is thrown, as opposed to just specific Exceptions?

If so:

try
{

...file IO...

}
catch(Exception e)
{
...do stuff with e, such as check its type or log it...
}
share|improve this answer
    
What should I do for the ones that are not specific?? –  Johanna Jul 2 '09 at 18:20
    
and I will catch all those specific Exceptions with catch(Exception e){}?? –  Johanna Jul 2 '09 at 18:20

Yes there is.

try
{
    //Read/write file
}catch(Exception ex)
{
    //catches all exceptions extended from Exception (which is everything)
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.