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I have a <div id="wrapper"></div>​ with

#wrapper {
    height: 300px;
    margin: 10px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 400px;
}​

When I resize the viewport so that horizontal scrollbars appear, the right margin disappears; I can only scroll as far right at the element's content, but I want the margin to be present on all sides. It also happens to the left margin if right: 0; is applied, and to the bottom margin if the viewport is made shorter. Giving wrapper a position: static; (default) makes no difference.

Why is this happening? It doesn't follow normal margin collapse rules. How can I get my margin back? I've tried giving the body padding/margin.. nada.

share|improve this question
    
I'm trying to understand, why not just set a right: 10px? – casraf May 29 '12 at 1:33
    
@OhMrBigshot It has no effect. Please demonstrate on the jsFiddle. I'd like to have an outermost element, none of whose margins collapse due to viewport resizing... – paislee May 29 '12 at 3:37
    
Try Position:relative, it will make your margin present on all side even after resize. – MSUH May 29 '12 at 10:14
    
@MSUH not seeing it jsfiddle.net/QHKmN/3 – paislee May 29 '12 at 16:54
up vote 3 down vote accepted
+100

Background Info

The default width of the body element is the html width which is also the window width (or iframe width in such a case). The default behavior of a block level element is that the scroll only accounts for the actual element (hence, it doesn't care about the right margin if there is nothing more to display on the right). This causes your right margin issue. (By the way, according to this article, the scroll bars are actually appearing on the html element, not the body.)

For Position: Absolute

By having #wrapper with position: absolute, the body element ends up with zero height. This causes your bottom margin issue in this case.

A solution is to account for the margins like so (see fiddle):

body {
    min-height: 320px;
    min-width: 420px; 
}

This assigns a minimum dimension to the body equal to the width + margins and height + margins of the absolute element.

Now, I'm not sure what you expect to happen if you have right: 0 set, as forcing a left margin to "remain" just ends up causing, in my opinion, a premature scroll bar to activate. See this fiddle.

Regarding Position: Static

The default block level behavior can be changed by forcing a shrink-wrap like behavior on the body element using (see fiddle):

body { display: inline-block; }

Note: that body { float: left; } did not give me the same shrink-wrap behavior (see fiddle).

The inline-block element will account for the margin of its inner elements to determine its own width, which then allows the right margin to work.

The reason the display: inline-block; solution does not work on the #wrapper being position: absolute is because it makes the body have a zero width and height, since the absolute positioning takes that element out of flow and there is nothing left inside body to give it dimension.

The above was currently only tested on IE9.

share|improve this answer
    
great answer, will bounty when possible. This came up because the wrapper element had a box shadow that was stylistically desirable, and it was not visible on two sides when viewport shrunk. Thanks – paislee May 29 '12 at 20:01

I'm afraid there's only one simple and quick solution, and that is to create a new div inside the wrapper div.

http://jsfiddle.net/QHKmN/2/

CSS

#wrapper {
    background: black;
    height: 300px;
    margin: 10px;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: 0;
    width: 400px;
}

#inwrapper {
    background: green;
    height: 290px;
    margin: 5px auto;
    position: relative;
    width: 390px;
}
​

HTML:

<div id="wrapper">
    <div id="inwrapper">

    </div>
</div>
​

And there's your margin.

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