Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have some automated tests that use HttpURLConnection to exercise a RESTful API.

Part of my code (below) asserts that the the response returns a certain HTTP Response code. I am expecting a HTTP 206 Response, but getResponseCode is always returning 200. However if I hit the url directly using curl, I get 'HTTP/1.1 206 Partial Content' as expected.

    URL requestURL = new URL(url);
    HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection) requestURL.openConnection();
    try {
        connection.setRequestProperty("Connection", "close");
        connection.setReadTimeout(5000);

        assertEquals("Request successfully handled", 
                expectedResponseCode, 
                connection.getResponseCode());

        InputStream input = connection.getInputStream();
        try {
            return toString(input);
        } finally {
            input.close();
        }
    } finally {
        connection.disconnect();
    }

Any ideas on why this is happening and how to get the behaviour I want?

share|improve this question

Try connection.getResponseMessage() method? It will probably contain the REST response where the actual code is found. The connection response may have come, but the actual operation response can be found in the message.

share|improve this answer
    
getResponseMessage() return 'OK', which is consistent with getResponseCode() return 200. – Oleksi May 25 '12 at 17:52
    
What's the RESTful API you're using? – kentcdodds May 25 '12 at 17:53
    
It's an API I wrote. Nothing public. – Oleksi May 25 '12 at 17:55
    
Huh, well then you probably know more about this than I do. Sorry... Good luck! – kentcdodds May 25 '12 at 17:55
    
Thanks anyway. :) – Oleksi May 25 '12 at 17:57

The code you posted performs as expected. Here's a complete test case to prove it:

import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpExchange;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpHandler;
import com.sun.net.httpserver.HttpServer;
import org.junit.After;
import org.junit.Before;
import org.junit.Test;

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.InputStream;
import java.net.HttpURLConnection;
import java.net.InetSocketAddress;
import java.net.URL;

import static org.hamcrest.CoreMatchers.equalTo;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;
import static org.junit.Assert.assertThat;

public class Http206Test {
    private HttpServer server;

    @Before
    public void setUp() throws Exception {
        server = HttpServer.create(new InetSocketAddress(8080), 0);
        server.createContext("/", new HttpHandler() {
            public void handle(HttpExchange t) throws IOException {
                t.sendResponseHeaders(206, 0);
                t.getResponseBody().write("I'm a 206 response".getBytes());
                t.getResponseBody().close();
            }
        });
        server.start();
    }

    @After
    public void tearDown() throws Exception {
        server.stop(1);
    }

    @Test
    public void httpUrlConnection206Response() throws Exception {
        String body = getContent("http://localhost:8080", 206);
        assertThat(body, equalTo("I'm a 206 response"));
    }

    @Test(expected = AssertionError.class)
    public void httpUrlConnection205Response() throws Exception {
        getContent("http://localhost:8080", 205);
    }

    public String getContent(String url, int expectedResponseCode) throws IOException {
        URL requestURL = new URL(url);
        HttpURLConnection connection = (HttpURLConnection) requestURL.openConnection();
        try {
            connection.setRequestProperty("Connection", "close");
            connection.setReadTimeout(5000);
            assertEquals("Request successfully handled",
                    expectedResponseCode,
                    connection.getResponseCode());
            InputStream input = connection.getInputStream();
            try {
                return toString(input);
            } finally {
                input.close();
            }
        } finally {
            connection.disconnect();
        }
    }

    public String toString(InputStream stream) throws IOException {
        int data;
        StringBuilder builder = new StringBuilder();
        while ((data = stream.read()) != -1) {
            builder.append((char) data);
        }
        return builder.toString();
    }
}

This implies your test is correct and there's a problem with your service.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting. Any idea why making a GET using curl to the same URL returns 206? Perhaps I am not setting some header or something? – Oleksi May 25 '12 at 18:15
    
Figured it out. See self-answer here: stackoverflow.com/a/10759669/1165637 – Oleksi May 25 '12 at 18:31
up vote 1 down vote accepted

So the problem was that I was calling write() before setting the response code. While this seems to work when used with curl, it does not work with the unit tests, since the code asserts the return code right after it gets input.

Problem code:

String responseMessage = response.getMessage();
OutputStreamWriter out = new OutputStreamWriter(httpResponse.getOutputStream());
out.write(responseMessage);
out.close();
httpResponse.setContentType("application/json");
httpResponse.setContentLength(responseMessage.length());
httpResponse.setStatus(response.getResponseCode());

Fixed code:

httpResponse.setStatus(response.getResponseCode()); //Do this first!
String responseMessage = response.getMessage();
OutputStreamWriter out = new OutputStreamWriter(httpResponse.getOutputStream());
out.write(responseMessage);
out.close();
httpResponse.setContentType("application/json");
httpResponse.setContentLength(responseMessage.length());
share|improve this answer
    
Huh, who would have though. Glad you figured it out! – kentcdodds May 25 '12 at 18:32
2  
The response code is in the first line of the HTTP response. If you write enough content for any stream buffers to be flushed--meaning part of the response gets sent back to the client--then it's too late to set the response code. Obviously curl was making requests differently than your code and somehow causing the buffering to behave differently. Without seeing anything else, I'd make a wild guess that it might be related to Content-Encoding. – Ryan Stewart May 25 '12 at 19:21
    
If the code for setting the status code was running too late, then the same should apply to setting the header fields. – Julian Reschke May 26 '12 at 8:50
1  
@JulianReschke: Not really. As shown, the server is probably using chunked transfer, which means headers can be inserted at any point during the message. – Ryan Stewart May 28 '12 at 16:16
    
Ryan: not true; once you have started sending the payload you can't send header anymore. Unless you rely on trailers, but as far as I can tell, they aren't implemented widely at all. – Julian Reschke May 29 '12 at 6:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.