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Here is a simple question. I have a dataset with values ranging from 0 to 3 and I want to get the number of elements of the dataset, which should be 4 in this case. Here is an example of the data:

structure(list(X1 = c(2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 2L, 2L), X2 = c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 0L, 2L, 3L, 1L), X3 = c(2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 0L, 0L, 
2L, 3L, 1L), X4 = c(1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 0L, 2L, 2L), X5 = c(1L, 
2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 2L, 1L), X6 = c(1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 
1L, 2L, 1L)), .Names = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4", "X5", "X6"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-9L))

I've tried diff(range(d)) but it doesn't count 0. Thanks in advance.

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1  
I think the confusion is that diff gives the difference of the endpoints (in your example, the range is 0 to 3, the difference of which is 3; if the range was 1 to 4, the difference would still be 3. The 0 is a red herring). What you want is the number of integers within the range 0 to 3 which is (assuming that the endpoints are integers) one more than the difference. diff(range(d))+1 (as @Tom said in another comment). Again, this would be true if the numbers were 1, 2, 3, and 4. –  Brian Diggs May 25 '12 at 18:26
1  
@BrianDiggs Yeah, except the OP just mentioned that length(unique()) returns 136 for them, which suggests that they do not in fact have data that consists of only the values 0,1 2 and 3. –  joran May 25 '12 at 18:27
    
@joran True, I wasn't keeping up with all the comments. We need to see structure of d to know. –  Brian Diggs May 25 '12 at 18:35
    
Well, I think diff(range(d))+1 solves the problem. I was just wondering if R had a more elegant way to solve this problem. Thanks a lot. –  Werner May 25 '12 at 18:40
2  
It appears that the piece of information you left out is that you wanted the unique values in a data frame. R considers that a list, whose length is the number of columns. So length(unique(unlist(dat))) is what you should be doing, I think. –  joran May 25 '12 at 18:52

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

length(unique(...)) does some possibly unexpected (although thoroughly documented) things when applied to a matrix or data frame.

s <- structure(list(X1 = c(2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 3L, 2L, 2L), X2 = c(1L, 
1L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 0L, 2L, 3L, 1L), X3 = c(2L, 1L, 2L, 2L, 0L, 0L, 
2L, 3L, 1L), X4 = c(1L, 2L, 2L, 2L, 1L, 2L, 0L, 2L, 2L), X5 = c(1L, 
2L, 1L, 2L, 1L, 0L, 1L, 2L, 1L), X6 = c(1L, 2L, 1L, 1L, 1L, 2L, 
1L, 2L, 1L)), .Names = c("X1", "X2", "X3", "X4", "X5", "X6"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, 
-9L))

When applied to a data frame, unique returns the unique rows in the data frame. length() then counts the number of columns in the data frame. So in general (I can't think of a counterexample), this will always be equal to ncol(s).

length(unique(s))  ## 6

unique applied to a matrix also returns the unique rows, but now length() counts the total number of elements: for your data this will usually be equivalent to ncol(s)*nrow(s).

length(unique(as.matrix(s)))  ## 54

If you want to apply unique to the elements in this situation, you probably want one of the following, all of which collapse the original data frame down to a single vector:

length(unique(as.vector(as.matrix(s)))) ## 4
length(unique(unlist(s)))  ## 4
length(unique(c(as.matrix(s)))) ## 4

Whether you want diff(range(x))+1 or length(unique(...)) depends on how you would want to count a data frame composed (for example) entirely of {0,1,2,4} -- should that return 4 or 5? (As @Brian Diggs points out in his answer, diff(range(...))+1 will work on a matrix, without needing to flatten the structure further -- it will also work on an unlist()ed data frame.)

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diff(range(d)) returns the difference between minimum and maximum, being 0 and 3 respectively

What you want to do is count how many elements there are in a set. Try length(d)

d <- 0:3
length(d)

Including the comments to this answer... Let the code speak

Example data:

dataset = 1:136
dataset = dataset %% 4
dim(dataset) <- c(4,34) //Now we have a table
diff(range(dataset))+1

It returns 4 like you wanted

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Thanks for answering. I've tried length, but that's not exactly what I need. I have a dataset with 136 elements, each element ranging from 0 to 3. I need to get the number of possible answers (from 0 to 3, including 0 as an answer). :) –  Werner May 25 '12 at 18:05
    
@Werner Combine length with unique. –  joran May 25 '12 at 18:13
2  
@Werner length(unique()) does what you describe. If it doesn't, then you haven't successfully described what you need to do. –  joran May 25 '12 at 18:19
2  
@Werner diff(range(d))+1 –  Tom May 25 '12 at 18:20
1  
@Werner If that's the case then you have rather massively misled us about the structure of your data. Edit your question to include a reproducible example that illustrates your data. –  joran May 25 '12 at 18:25

Given the structure of d you have now provided, you can do a column-by-column calculation of this.

> diff(range(d$X1))+1
[1] 3
> diff(range(d$X1))+1
[1] 3
> diff(range(d$X2))+1
[1] 4
> diff(range(d$X3))+1
[1] 4
> diff(range(d$X4))+1
[1] 3
> diff(range(d$X5))+1
[1] 3
> diff(range(d$X6))+1
[1] 2

Or you can loop over all the columns

> lapply(d, function(dp) {diff(range(dp))+1})
$X1
[1] 3

$X2
[1] 4

$X3
[1] 4

$X4
[1] 3

$X5
[1] 3

$X6
[1] 2

Or if you want the range for all the columns collectively, treat it as a matrix:

> diff(range(as.matrix(d)))+1
[1] 4
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