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I have a model Foo with several belongs_to associations; I'll refer to them here as Bar and Baz. So the model would look like this:

class Foo
  belongs_to :bar
  belongs_to :baz

  def do_stuff_with_bar_and_baz
    bar.do_stuff(baz)
  end
end

We noticed that do_stuff_with_bar_and_baz was unusually slow (~4 seconds), even though the underlying MySQL statements were very fast (~0.5ms). I benchmarked the bar and baz calls, and discovered that they took ~2.3s and ~221ms respectively... just to go through the Rails association code.

I then put in the following methods:

class Foo
  belongs_to :bar
  belongs_to :baz

  def bar
    Bar.find(self.bar_id)
  end

  def baz
    Baz.find(self.baz_id)
  end

  def do_stuff_with_bar_and_baz
    bar.do_stuff(baz)
  end
end

This bypasses the ActiveRecord association code and loads the associated records directly. With this code, the time to load the Bar and Baz in do_stuff_with_bar_and_baz dropped to 754ms and 5ms respectively.

This is disheartening. The standard Rails associations appear to be horrendously inefficient, but I really don't want to have to replace all of them (that defeats a the purpose of a significant amount of ActiveRecord).

So, I'm looking for alternatives:

  • Is there something that I'm potentially doing wrong that's slowing things down? (The real code is obviously more complicated that this. However, the belongs_to is accurate; there's no additional options on the real code).
  • Have other people encountered this?
  • How have they dealt with it?
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1  
I can't say I've ever seen anything like this before. 754 ms seems like a massive amount of time to load a record by it's primary key. –  Frederick Cheung May 31 '12 at 15:54

1 Answer 1

Seems like you have different queries and problem is not in rails, but in DB. Maybe you have other conditions and you haven't right indexes for they.

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If that were the case, then the MySQL query time would be much higher and a much larger slice of the slowness pie. But it's clocking in at <1ms. –  Craig Walker Jun 1 '12 at 17:40

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