Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's define this simple code :

class Foo
  @foo = 'blah'
  console.log(@foo)

class Bar extends Foo
  constructor: () ->
    console.log(@foo)

  bar: () ->
    console.log(@foo)

b = new Bar
b.bar()

And result is :

blah
undefined
undefined

How can I access @foo in inherited class ?

Thanks!

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You actually want to write

console.log(@constructor.foo)

in Bar's constructor. (Working example here.) @constructor points to the class (Bar), which inherits the static properties of Foo. Those properties aren't on the instance, which is what @ points to from the constructor.

(Yes, it's weird that it's @constructor rather than @class, but that's because obj.constructor is a JavaScript-ism, not a special CoffeeScript syntax.)

To clarify further: In the class body, @ points to the class. In the constructor, @ points to the instance. Hence the apparent inconsistency. I devote a lot of time to this in the chapter on classes in my book, CoffeeScript: Accelerated JavaScript Development.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the insight! –  asawyer May 25 '12 at 18:45
    
And if I want to access to @foo from another method than the constructor ? –  magnetik May 25 '12 at 18:48
    
I've modified my question to reflect this. –  magnetik May 25 '12 at 18:55
1  
The answer is the same. b.bar() calls that method in the context of b, so @constructor will point to the Bar class. Working example. I would, again, refer you to my book for a clearer understanding of how @/this works. –  Trevor Burnham May 26 '12 at 14:43
    
I will definitively look into buying your book. T hanks for this answer ! –  magnetik May 27 '12 at 7:12
add comment

foo is a property of the Foo constructor, not it's prototype:

class Bar extends Foo
  constructor: () ->
    console.log(Foo.foo)
  bar: () ->
    console.log(Foo.foo)
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.