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Problem
Are there any computationally feasible approaches to intra-register deduplication of a set of integers using x86 SIMD instructions?

Example
We have a 4-tuple register R1 = {3, 9, 2, 9}, and wish to obtain register R2 = {3, 9, 2, NULL}.

Restrictions
Stablility. Preservation of the input order is of no significance.

Output. However, any removed values/NULLs must be at the beginning and/or end of the register:

  • {null, 1, 2, 3} - OK
  • {1, 2, null, null} - OK
  • {null, 2, null, null} - OK
  • {null, 2, null, 1} - Invalid order
  • {null, null, null, null} - Invalid output

It is obviously a bonus if it is known to produce one particular output format. Please assume NULL to effectively mean 0 (zero).

Generality. Must be able to tolerate the absence of duplicates, and in this case produce an output equivalent to the input register.

Instruction sets. I'm looking for solutions for any or all of: SSE2-SSSE3; SSE4.x; AVX-AVX2

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For example, in SSE4 one might be able to iteratively use RMAX = _mm_max_epi32, and conditionally write from RMAX to the output register only if RMAX != RMAX_PREV? –  Martin Källman May 25 '12 at 19:09
    
Assuming this is homework: You should look at the pshufd and pcmpeqd instructions. –  hirschhornsalz May 25 '12 at 19:35
    
Haha, no, this is not homework. ;) –  Martin Källman May 25 '12 at 19:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Naive solution

Crude pseudo-code based on the Max() operation. Comments track the data for the first iteration.

A = RIN //{3, 9, 2, 9}

For i = 0 .. 3:

  B = Rotate(A, 1) //{9, 2, 9, 3}
  C = Rotate(A, 2) //{2, 9, 3, 9}
  D = Rotate(A, 3) //{9, 3, 9, 2}

  RMAX = Max(A,B) //{9, 9, 9, 9}
  RMAX = Max(RMAX, C) //{9, 9, 9, 9}
  RMAX = Max(RMAX, D) //{9, 9, 9, 9}

  ROUT[i] = RMAX[0] //ROUT = {9, null, null, null}

  TMP  = A
  MASK = Equality(RMAX, TMP) //MASK = {0, 1, 0, 1}
  MASK = Invert(MASK) //MASK = {1, 0, 1, 0}
  Clear(A)
  A = MoveMasked(TMP, MASK) //A = {3, null, 2, null}

Some thoughts:

A = RIN //{3, 9, 2, 9}

B = Rotate(A, 1) //{9, 2, 9, 3}
C = Rotate(A, 2) //{2, 9, 3, 9}
D = Rotate(A, 3) //{9, 3, 9, 2}

maskA = cmpeq(A,B) //{0,  0,  0,  0}
maskB = cmpeq(A,C) //{0, -1,  0, -1}
maskC = cmpeq(A,D) //{0,  0,  0,  0}

indexA = horSum( { 1,2,4,8 } * maskA ) // 0
indexB = horSum( { 1,2,4,8 } * maskB ) // 10
indexC = horSum( { 1,2,4,8 } * maskC ) // 0

// The problem is this function here
// Of the 4096 possible indexABC only a subset will occur
// Based on an enumeration of all possible indexes a pattern
// for an lookup table could possibly be found
shuffleConst = lookupShuffle( indexA, indexB, indexC )

shuffle(A, shuffleConst)
share|improve this answer
    
What does MoveMasked do? If it just moves the masked values, this routine will just remove the maximum value –  hirschhornsalz May 25 '12 at 20:03
    
For every iteration i, we find the maximum value in A which is stored in RMAX. Then, we compare A and RMAX for equality to create a mask, and then feed TMP back into A, with the maximum value removed. (Updated due to bug - well spotted) –  Martin Källman May 25 '12 at 20:11
    
Ok, I see now. I think instead of the maximum a compare equal could be used. One needs to enumerate all the patterns with duplicate integers and use the masks generated from the comparison to calculate a index, which may be used in a lookup table for shuffle constants. –  hirschhornsalz May 25 '12 at 20:17
    
Possibly for the lookup table a pshufb instruction could be used - if the table is not larger than 16 elements. This way everything would stay in registers. I am not sure if this is feasible. –  hirschhornsalz May 25 '12 at 20:22
    
I see how we can use Shuffle() as a substitute for Rotate(), but I'm not quite sure how to substitute Max() for Shuffle()? Would you be willing to jot down some pseudo-code? :) –  Martin Källman May 25 '12 at 20:25

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